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Latest Mesozoic Stories

Fossil Bird Discovered With Teeth For A Tough Diet
2013-01-07 11:02:26

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A trip to the Galapagos islands will bring you face to face with 14 closely related species of finch that Charles Darwin discovered on his adventure abroad in the 1830s. The finches he noted, still referenced in essentially every biology textbook, had beak sizes of varying lengths and sizes. This was true of both the ground- and tree-dwelling birds, and Darwin postulated that differing diets might have required the birds´ unique...

Dinosaur Fossil Smuggler Pleads Guilty
2013-01-01 05:47:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Eric Prokopi, a Florida fossils dealer, has pled guilty to smuggling charges. He has agreed to give up the $1 million Tyrannosaurus bataar skeleton seized by the U.S. government earlier this year after he attempted to auction it through Heritage Auctions. Prokopi is giving up "Ty," the T. bataar that will eventually be returned to Mongolia, along with six other dinosaurs and various other bones in a deal that might win him a little...

Massive Sauropod Dinosaurs Ate More To Get Much Needed Nitrogen
2012-12-12 16:10:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A pair of U.K. biologists has revived an older and heavily debated theory that suggests sauropod dinosaurs reached their massive sizes due to the plants they ate. About ten years ago, plant ecologists from South Africa originally formulated this theory; however their ideas have fallen out of favor with many dinosaur researchers. According to a paper from David Wilkinson of Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) and Graeme Ruxton...

Evolution Of Theropods Linked To Environmental Factors
2012-11-29 05:41:02

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The heaviest flying bird tops out at between 40-42 pounds. And sure, some of the flightless birds can grow to upwards of 300 pounds. But to imagine ancestors of these modern day creatures tipping the scales at upwards of 7,000 pounds is hard to do, indeed. A recent study out of North Carolina State University (NCSU) and the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois, looks specifically at the feathered herbivores of the Cretaceous period...

Dinosaur Had Fangs But Only Ate Plants
2012-10-03 14:32:26

[ Watch the Video: Making of Heterodontosaurus Flesh Model ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have unveiled new details about a fanged dinosaur with a parrot-shaped beak known as Pegomastax africanus. A single specimen of the new species was first uncovered in southern Africa in the 1960's, but new details of the dinosaur's anatomy and lifestyle have been published in the journal ZooKeys. Scientists report that Pegomastax had fangs, but was more in...

Dinosaur Abdominal Analysis Reveals Wolf-Like Hunting Prowess
2012-08-30 11:07:46

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Analysis of two dinosaur fossil specimens have revealed new information about hunting and feeding behaviors of a wolf-like dinosaur, according to a report published in the latest issue of PLoS ONE. Researchers from University of Alberta at Edmonton found evidence that a feathered dinosaur known as Sinocalliopteryx was able to capture and consume small flying dinosaurs. Sinocalliopteryx, itself a flightless dinosaur, stood about...

What Did The Jurassic Age Diplodocus Eat?
2012-07-31 08:46:03

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of researchers from the University of Bristol, Natural History Museum of London, the University of Missouri and Ohio University report they have discovered the eating habits of the Jurassic age dinosaur, the Diplodocus. Found nearly 130 years ago, the eating habits of the giant herbivore were still largely uncertain until now. Understanding these habits could provide insights into extinct ecosystems and today's modern animal...

North America's Oldest, Smallest Horn Dinosaur Species Finally Named
2012-03-17 04:49:02

Two dinosaur species discovered in the Canadian province of Alberta, including the oldest and smallest horned species ever found in North America, have finally been named after decades of research, various media outlets reported earlier this week. According to Emily Chung of CBC News, the first dinosaur, which is approximately the same size as "a medium-sized dog," was named Gryphoceratops morrisoni in honor of Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) technician Ian Morrison. Morrison reportedly was...

Velociraptors Didn't Turn Down Free Meals
2012-03-07 07:43:28

Scientists have found evidence that specialized predators, such as the velociraptor, may not have been willing to turn down a free meal. A bone from a pterosaur (or “Pterodactyl”) has reportedly been found in the gut of a velociraptor that lived in the Gobi desert of Magnolia more than 75 million years ago. The scientists published their findings online in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, and Palaeoecology. This discovery suggests that the velociraptor may not have only...

2011-12-19 14:34:12

First record of a sauropod dinosaur in Antarctica suggests more widespread distribution of this species than previously thought For the first time, the presence of large bodied herbivorous dinosaurs in Antarctica has been recorded. Until now, remains of sauropoda - one of the most diverse and geographically widespread species of herbivorous dinosaurs - had been recovered from all continental landmasses, except Antarctica. Dr. Ignacio Alejandro Cerda, from CONICET in Argentina, and his...


Latest Mesozoic Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Othniel Charles Marsh
2013-10-14 09:50:48

Othniel Charles Marsh (October 29, 1831 – March 18, 1899) was an American paleontologist, specializing primarily in vertebrates. He is highly renowned as one of the most prominent scientists of his time, having discovered and described dozens of new species. Marsh is also credited with developing what is currently the most widely accepted theory of the origin of birds. Marsh was born in Lockport, New York, to a family of moderate means. Thanks to the generosity of his uncle, George...

Styracosaurus
2013-04-29 14:54:48

Styracosaurus, meaning “spiked lizard” from the Ancient Greek styrax “spike at the butt-end of a spear-shaft” and sauros “lizard” was a genus of herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur from the Cretaceous Period, about 76.5 to 75 million years ago. It had four to six long horns, stretching from its neck frill, a smaller horn on each cheek, and a single horn jutting out from its nose, which may have been up to 2 feet long and 6 inches wide. The function/functions of these horns and frills...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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