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Latest Mesozoic Stories

New Evidence Says Three Dinosaurs Are Actually One
2011-12-15 13:41:51

Researchers report that they have found further evidence that genera of the Triceratops actually represent different individuals that all belong to the Triceratops genus. The three genera, Triceratops, Torosaurus, and Nedoceratops, were thought at one time or another thought to be distinct. However, the work by John Scanella of Montana State University and colleagues shows that these dinosaurs are actually the result of maturity.  They focused on a single skull that has been the...

Image 1 - Nest Of Dinosaurs Discovered In Mongolia
2011-11-21 14:43:24

Archaeologists have discovered a nest containing 15 fossilized juvenile Protoceratops andrewsi dinosaurs in Mongolia. The discovery is the first nest of this genus ever found and the first indication that Protoceratops juveniles remained in the nest for an extended period. David Fastovsky, URI professor of geosciences with the University of Rhode Island, said the nest was 2.3 feet in diameter and his team discovered it in the Djadochta Formation at Tugrikinshire, Mongolia. "Finding...

Image 1 - New Raptor Species Announced
2011-09-20 11:01:42

  A graduate student from Montana State University is part of a team of researchers that revealed a new species of raptorial dinosaur to the public on Monday, the first definitive troodontid theropod discovered from the Late Cretaceous Period of North America in more than 75 years. MSU doctoral student Mike Knell, MSU paleontologist David Varricchio, three colleagues, and lead researcher Lindsay Zanno, from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside and the Field Museum of Natural...

2011-06-02 00:00:30

Stocktrek Images launches a new collection of digital fine art showcasing prehistoric life on Earth during the Paleozoic Era's primitive growth of plant life to the Mesozoic Era's age of dinosaurs. Tampa, FL (PRWEB) June 01, 2011 Stocktrek Images expands its niche market, adding a new genre of dinosaur art to its collection of specialty image content. The new collection focuses on the natural history of Earth, with specific attention to the Paleozoic Era's growth of life's diversity, to the...

2011-05-26 16:55:00

Chinasaurs Exhibit and Sea Rex IMAX® Film Open May 26 for short summer run at Museum of Nature & Science DALLAS, May 26, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Museum of Nature & Science is launching a double dinosaur deal that offers a comprehensive look at the Mesozoic Era, through the opening of a new dinosaur exhibit, Chinasaurs, and accompanying IMAX® film, Sea Rex: Journey to a Prehistoric World. Both open May 26 at the Museum's Fair Park...

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2011-05-10 09:43:16

Researchers have discovered that an evolutionary change from 65 million years ago may have set the pace for the rapid growth rate of present-day flowering plants. Taylor Feild, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in collaboration with a group of other researchers from around the world, have determined the precise dates that angiosperms, or flowering plants, experienced two surges in growth during the Cretaceous period. Their...

2011-01-11 13:40:27

Persistence paid off for a University of Alberta paleontology researcher, who after months of pondering the origins of a fossilized jaw bone, finally identified it as a new species of pterosaur, a flying reptile that lived 70 million years ago. Victoria Arbour says she was stumped when the small piece of jaw bone was first pulled out of of a fossil storage cabinet in the U of A's paleontology department. "It could have been from a dinosaur, a fish or a marine reptile," said Arbour. " Arbour,...

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2010-09-17 08:29:04

Tyrannosaurs are more than large carnivores at the top of the food chain We've all heard this story: the Late Cretaceous of Asia and North America"”about 65 million years ago"”was dominated by several large-headed, bipedal predatory dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus rex and Tarbosaurus that had tiny arms. But a decade of new fossil discoveries that have more than doubled the number of known tyrannosaur species has changed this tale. Older and smaller tyrannosaurs have made the...

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2010-08-24 09:30:00

The amount of available living space--not competition, as Darwin believed--may have been the catalyst of evolution, according to a new study published in the August 23 edition of Biology Letters. As part of the study, researchers at the University of Bristol analyzed the fossils of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians dating as far back as 400 million years ago. According to BBC News science reporter Howard Falcon-Lang, "the scientists showed that the amount of biodiversity closely...

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2010-08-10 20:20:00

The Gondwana supercontinent underwent a 60-degree rotation across Earth's surface during the Early Cambrian period, according to new evidence uncovered by a team of Yale University geologists. Gondwana made up the southern half of Pangaea, the giant supercontinent that constituted the Earth's landmass before it broke up into the separate continents we see today. The study, which appears in the August issue of the journal Geology, has implications for the environmental conditions that existed...


Latest Mesozoic Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Othniel Charles Marsh
2013-10-14 09:50:48

Othniel Charles Marsh (October 29, 1831 – March 18, 1899) was an American paleontologist, specializing primarily in vertebrates. He is highly renowned as one of the most prominent scientists of his time, having discovered and described dozens of new species. Marsh is also credited with developing what is currently the most widely accepted theory of the origin of birds. Marsh was born in Lockport, New York, to a family of moderate means. Thanks to the generosity of his uncle, George...

Styracosaurus
2013-04-29 14:54:48

Styracosaurus, meaning “spiked lizard” from the Ancient Greek styrax “spike at the butt-end of a spear-shaft” and sauros “lizard” was a genus of herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur from the Cretaceous Period, about 76.5 to 75 million years ago. It had four to six long horns, stretching from its neck frill, a smaller horn on each cheek, and a single horn jutting out from its nose, which may have been up to 2 feet long and 6 inches wide. The function/functions of these horns and frills...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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