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Latest Mesozoic Stories

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2008-08-07 10:45:00

New study on hadrosaur bones shows fast growth, reproduction rates With long limbs and a soft body, the duck-billed hadrosaur had few defenses against predators such as tyrannosaurs. But new research on the bones of this plant-eating dinosaur suggests that it had at least one advantage: It grew to adulthood much faster than its predators, giving it superiority in size. In a study published online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, scientists...

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2008-05-25 09:10:00

Colorado Springs has a dinosaur to call its own, a beast that's never been found anywhere else in the world. Scientists planned to announce Saturday at Garden of the Gods that century-old assumptions about a dinosaur skull found in the park in the late 1800s are wrong. The fossils don't belong to the type of dinosaur -- the camptosaurus -- that early bone hunters thought it did. It seems the skull fragments belong to a dino that's new to science, a conclusion that sent ripples through the...

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2008-04-22 12:20:00

In a paper published in this month's "ËœGeophysical Journal International', Dr Graeme Eagles from the Earth Sciences Department at Royal Holloway, University of London, reveals how one of the largest continents ever to exist met its demise.Gondwana was a "Ëœsupercontinent' that existed between 500 and 180 million years ago. For the past four decades, geologists have debated how Gondwana eventually broke up, developing a multitude of scenarios which can be loosely grouped...

2007-11-11 03:00:08

By Lipkin, Christine Sereno, Paul C; Horner, John R INTRODUCTION OSSIFIED CLAVICLES, either as paired elements or as a median furcula, have been recorded in all major clades of dinosaurs, including ornithischians, sauropodomorphs, and theropods (Bryant and Russell, 1993). Nearly all but the most basal theropods, Eoraptor lunensis and Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis, have an ossified furcula including coelophysids (Downs, 2000; Tykoski et al., 2002; Carrano et al., 2005), allosauroids (Chure...

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2007-09-06 15:13:39

An 80-million-year-old dinosaur fossil unearthed in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia demonstrates that miniaturization, long thought to be a hallmark of bird origins and a necessary precursor of flight, occurred progressively in primitive dinosaurs. The find, described in the September 7 issue of the journal Science, is made up of the fossilized bones of a new dinosaur the researchers have named Mahakala, and includes portions of its skull, forelimb and hindlimb, as well as much of the vertebral...

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2007-06-13 09:10:00

BERKELEY -- The peculiar pose of many fossilized dinosaurs, with wide-open mouth, head thrown back and recurved tail, likely resulted from the agonized death throes typical of brain damage and asphyxiation, according to two paleontologists. A classic example of the posture, which has puzzled paleontologists for ages, is the 150 million-year-old Archaeopteryx, the first-known example of a feathered dinosaur and the proposed link between dinosaurs and present-day birds. "Virtually all...

2006-03-15 13:05:00

By Patricia Reaney LONDON -- A newly discovered, perfectly preserved fossil of a 150 million-year-old dinosaur found in southern Germany may force scientists to rethink how and when feathers evolved. The nearly complete remains of the chicken-size dinosaur named Juravenator, which is described in the journal Nature on Wednesday, were preserved in limestone. But unlike other members of the group of two-legged meat-eating predators known as coelurosaurs, it had no feathers. "It is an absolutely...

2005-10-18 09:37:18

LONDON (Reuters) - A new species of flying reptile that died out with the dinosaurs 65 million years ago has been named for its fang-like teeth, British scientists said on Tuesday. Palaeobiologists at the University of Portsmouth in southern England dubbed the remains of the pterosaur found on a beach on the Isle of Wight three years ago Caulkicephalus trimicrodon. Caulkhead is the informal name for natives of the Isle of Wight, off the southern coast of England, and trimicrodon...

2005-07-28 13:01:57

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Unhatched dinosaur eggs dating back 190 million years carried fully developed embryos that would have been born clumsy and helpless, scientists said on Thursday. Their finding, published in Friday's issue of the journal Science, suggests even the earliest dinosaurs tended carefully to their young. It also raises questions about how the giant four-legged dinosaurs called sauropods evolved. "These animals do not have any...

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2005-06-27 16:40:00

The fossilized skeleton of a small crocodile relative excavated last year at Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona throws a wrench into theories of how and where the dinosaurs arose more than 210 million years ago at the end of the Triassic Period. This suggests that the herbivorous ornithischians and the meat-eating theropods, like Tyrannosaurus rex, did not evolve together in the Late Triassic as many paleontologists thought. Astrobiology Magazine -- The fossilized skeleton of a small...


Latest Mesozoic Reference Libraries

Othniel Charles Marsh
2013-10-14 09:50:48

Othniel Charles Marsh (October 29, 1831 – March 18, 1899) was an American paleontologist, specializing primarily in vertebrates. He is highly renowned as one of the most prominent scientists of his time, having discovered and described dozens of new species. Marsh is also credited with developing what is currently the most widely accepted theory of the origin of birds. Marsh was born in Lockport, New York, to a family of moderate means. Thanks to the generosity of his uncle, George...

Styracosaurus
2013-04-29 14:54:48

Styracosaurus, meaning “spiked lizard” from the Ancient Greek styrax “spike at the butt-end of a spear-shaft” and sauros “lizard” was a genus of herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur from the Cretaceous Period, about 76.5 to 75 million years ago. It had four to six long horns, stretching from its neck frill, a smaller horn on each cheek, and a single horn jutting out from its nose, which may have been up to 2 feet long and 6 inches wide. The function/functions of these horns and frills...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

Megalosaurus
2013-04-28 14:57:47

Megalaosaurus, meaning “Great Lizard”, from Greek megalo, meaning ‘big’ or ‘tall’ and sauros, meaning “lizard”, is a genus of large and meat-eating theropod dinosaurs of the Middle Jurassic period of Europe. It’s significant as the first genus of dinosaur, outside of birds, to be described and named. Megalosaurus might have been the first dinosaur to be described in scientific literature. Part of a bone was recovered from a limestone quarry at Cornwell by Chipping Norton,...

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