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Latest Messenger RNA Stories

2012-07-20 01:50:16

New research has shown that a protein does something that scientists once thought impossible: It unfolds itself and refolds into a completely new shape. This protein, called RfaH, activates genes that allow bacterial cells to launch a successful attack on their host, causing disease. The researchers determined that RfaH starts out in its alpha form, composed of two spiral shapes. Later, in its beta form, it resembles spokes on a wheel and is called a barrel. When RfaH refolds, it...

2012-07-05 23:58:43

The findings have implications for the development of new anti-cancer drugs Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a series of intricate biochemical steps that lead to the successful production of proteins, the basic working units of any cell. The study, which appears in the July 6, 2012 edition of the journal Cell, sheds light on the assembly of a structure called the ribosome, a large and complex protein-producing machine inside all living...

The Key To Self-renewing Skin
2012-07-05 13:45:19

In the July 6 issue of Cell Stem Cell, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe how human epidermal progenitor cells and stem cells control transcription factors to avoid premature differentiation, preserving their ability to produce new skin cells throughout life. The findings provide new insights into the role and importance of exosomes and their targeted gene transcripts, and may help point the way to new drugs or therapies for not just skin...

2012-05-18 02:18:32

Genetic discovery will revolutionize understanding of gene expression Over the past decade, research in the field of epigenetics has revealed that chemically modified bases are abundant components of the human genome and has forced us to abandon the notion we've had since high school genetics that DNA consists of only four bases. Now, researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have made a discovery that once again forces us to rewrite our textbooks. This time, however, the findings...

2012-05-10 22:27:49

Max Planck researchers found over 2500 mRNA along dendrites and axons How do we build a memory in the brain? It is well known that for animals (and humans) new proteins are needed to establish long-term memories. During learning information is stored at the synapses, the junctions connecting nerve cells. Synapses also require new proteins in order to show changes in their strength (synaptic plasticity). Historically, scientists have focused on the cell body as the place where the required...

2012-05-09 21:29:37

Sanford-Burnham researchers develop a method called miR-TRAP, which allows scientists to better understand the roles microRNAs play in human development and disease Human cells are thought to produce thousands of different microRNAs (miRNAs)–small pieces of genetic material that help determine which genes are turned on or off at a given time. miRNAs are an important part of normal cellular function, but they can also contribute to human disease–some are elevated in certain...

2012-04-27 22:18:04

Novel regulatory molecules called mirror-microRNAs control multiple aspects of brain function Our genes control many aspects of who we are – from the colour of our hair to our vulnerability to certain diseases – but how are the genes, and consequently the proteins they make themselves controlled? Researchers have discovered a new group of molecules which control some of the fundamental processes behind memory function and may hold the key to developing new therapies for...

2012-02-29 14:09:28

It had long been assumed that the human sperm cell´s mission in life ended once it had transferred its freight of parental DNA to the egg. More recently however, other components of sperm have been implicated in fertilization, and perhaps even in subsequent embryonic development. In a new study appearing in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, Timothy Karr, a researcher at Arizona State University´s Biodesign Institute, along with colleagues from the Universities of Cambridge...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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