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Latest Metalloids Stories

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2012-07-10 07:28:11

Scientists have disproved a 2010 NASA study regarding how some bacterial life can thrive on arsenic.

2012-06-29 11:52:22

Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic from contaminated water, and we are all exposed to arsenic via the food we eat.

2012-03-22 21:10:47

Exposure to arsenic in soil and mine waste may have contributed to a slight increase in past cancer risk in socio-economically disadvantaged areas in the Goldfields region of Victoria.

2012-02-23 18:00:24

A large-scale genomic study conducted in Bangladesh has discovered genetic variants that control arsenic metabolism and elevate the risk of skin lesions in people chronically exposed to arsenic.

Arsenic Levels In Some Organic Foods Surpass FDA Limits
2012-02-16 09:11:56

Researchers from Dartmouth reported today that potentially high levels of arsenic have been found in brown rice syrup, a primary ingredient in many organic foods.

2012-02-08 23:52:55

Risks related to the critical nature of arsenic — used to make high-speed computer chips that contain gallium arsenide — outstrip those of other substances in a group of critical materials needed to sustain modern technology, a new study has found.


Latest Metalloids Reference Libraries

28_d4102ec3fa58ab4ec89b14854e71f081
2005-05-26 10:53:59

Germanium is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Ge and atomic number 32. This is a lustrous, hard, silver-white, metalloid that is chemically similar to tin. Germanium forms a large number of organometallic compounds and is an important semiconductor material used in transistors. Notable characteristics Germanium is a hard, grayish-white element that has a metallic luster and the same crystal structure as diamond. In addition, it is important to note that...

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Word of the Day
mitraille
  • Small missiles, especially grape, canister, fragments of iron, and the like, when fired, as upon an enemy at close quarters.
  • To fire mitraille at.
The word 'mitraille' comes from the Old French 'mitaille', meaning 'small coins', sometimes used to mean 'scrap iron'.