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Latest Methylation Stories

2012-07-06 11:45:15

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that DNA methylation is responsible for switching on and off a gene that produces the MMP13 enzyme that is known to be important in the destruction of cartilage In what could be a breakthrough in the practical application of epigenetic science, U.K. scientists used human tissue samples to discover that those with osteoarthritis have a signature epigenetic change (DNA methylation) responsible for switching on and off a gene that produces a...

Epigenetics Changes Genes In Rheumatoid Arthritis
2012-07-03 12:19:12

It's not just our DNA that makes us susceptible to disease and influences its impact and outcome. Scientists are beginning to realize more and more that important changes in genes that are unrelated to changes in the DNA sequence itself — a field of study known as epigenetics — are equally influential. A research team at the University of California, San Diego — led by Gary S. Firestein, professor in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology at UC San Diego...

2012-05-22 21:26:36

The latest study was published as a highlighted paper in Nature Communications In a highlighted paper published online in Nature Communications, researchers from Sichuan Agricultural University and BGI, the world's largest genomics organization, reported the atlas of DNA methylomes in porcine adipose and muscle tissues, providing a valuable epigenomic source for obesity prediction and prevention as well as boosting the further development of pig as a model animal for human obesity...

2012-05-14 22:22:55

Alterations to the "on-off" switches of genes occur early in the development of prostate cancer and could be used as biomarkers to detect the disease months or even years earlier than current approaches, a Mayo Clinic study has found. These biomarkers – known as DNA methylation profiles – also can predict if the cancer is going to recur and if that recurrence will remain localized to the prostate or, instead, spread to other organs. The study, published in the journal Clinical...

2012-05-03 19:28:41

Lawson research provides new insight into disease pathology In a new study from Lawson Health Research Institute, Dr. Joseph Torchia has identified a new genetic pathway influencing the spread of cancer cells. The discovery of this mechanism could lead to new avenues for treatment. Regular cell division is regulated by methylation, a series of chemical changes. Methylation modifies DNA to ensure cells divide at a healthy, balanced rate. In cancer, the methylation process is unbalanced,...

2012-05-03 19:25:16

Results suggest researchers implement careful quality control A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the University of California (UC) San Diego has discovered a new type of dynamic change in human stem cells. Last year, this team reported recurrent changes in the genomes of human pluripotent stem cells as they are expanded in culture. The current report, which appears in the May 4, 2012 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell, shows that these cells can also change...

2012-05-01 09:42:57

A team of Stowers scientists defines biochemical crosstalk between DNA interacting proteins and their modifications When stretched out, the genome of a single human cell can reach six feet. To package it all into a tiny nucleus, the DNA strand is tightly wrapped around a core of histone proteins in repeating units–each unit known as a nucleosome. To allow access for the gene expression machinery the nucleosomes must open up and regroup when the process is complete. In the May 1,...

2012-03-28 00:18:02

In a new study, researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have identified epigenetic changes — known as DNA methylation — in the blood of patients with schizophrenia. The researchers were also able to detect differences depending on how old the patients were when they developed the disease and whether they had been treated with various drugs. In the future this new knowledge may be used to develop a simple test to diagnose patients with schizophrenia....

2012-03-02 14:02:45

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have figured out how the human body keeps essential genes switched “on” and silences the vast stretches of genetic repeats and “junk” DNA. Frédéric Chédin, associate professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, describes the research in a paper published today (March 1) in the journal Molecular Cell. The work could lead to treatments for lupus and other...


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