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Latest Michael Griffin Stories

2006-02-17 00:00:00

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON -- The U.S. human spaceflight program is "strained to the limit," NASA's chief said on Thursday, warning against any long gap between the end of the shuttle era and the first flight of a planned new spaceship. "The United States risks both a real and a perceived loss of leadership on the world stage if we are unable to launch our own astronauts into space for an extended period of time when other nations possess their own capabilities to do so," NASA...

2006-02-16 15:55:00

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. human spaceflight program is "strained to the limit," NASA's chief said on Thursday, warning against any long gap between the end of the shuttle era and the first flight of a planned new spaceship. "The United States risks both a real and a perceived loss of leadership on the world stage if we are unable to launch our own astronauts into space for an extended period of time when other nations possess their own capabilities to do so," NASA...

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2006-01-19 13:05:00

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- An unmanned NASA spacecraft the size and shape of a concert piano hurtled toward Pluto on Thursday on a 3-billion-mile journey to the solar system's last unexplored planet - a voyage so long that some of the scientists who will be celebrating its arrival are still in junior high. The New Horizons spacecraft blasted off aboard an Atlas V rocket in a spectacular start to the $700 million mission. Though it is the fastest spacecraft ever launched, capable of reaching...

2006-01-10 15:10:00

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON -- NASA chief Michael Griffin warned astronomers on Tuesday that funds for their programs will be tighter than they have been in the past decade as NASA focuses more on manned space missions. "The growth of science within NASA has been in the 5 to 7 percent range, annualized over the last decade or so, and that's been great," Griffin told members of the American Astronomical Society. "We're in a budget environment right now when that level of growth can't be...

2005-12-07 00:15:00

By Adam Tanner SAN FRANCISCO -- The head of NASA said on Tuesday that the U.S. space agency has had to scale back its plans even since he took the job in April because of "daunting fiscal realities." In early 2004, U.S. President George W. Bush outlined a vision of returning humans back to the moon by 2020 and eventually to Mars. Some had hoped such a program would reignite public interest in the space program that has waned since the 1960s and early 1970s. "We must also acknowledge the plain...

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2005-11-17 01:40:00

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida -- NASA wants private enterprise to get involved in its plans to send manned spaceflights to the moon and beyond, the agency's head said on Wednesday. Businesses could, for example, take on the task of flying and tending to fuel depots in low-Earth orbit that would service spaceships heading to the moon and eventually Mars, NASA Administrator Michael Griffin said at the Florida Space conference being held at the Kennedy Space Center this week. Fuel makes...

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2005-11-05 01:25:00

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida -- Nearly two years ago, President George W. Bush told NASA to help finish the International Space Station, return to the moon and then prepare for a manned space flight to Mars. But that vision is crumbling as the U.S. space agency realizes it does not have the money it needs for the job. NASA Administrator Michael Griffin revealed this week the agency faced a $3 billion to $5 billion shortfall in its space shuttle program alone over the next five...

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2005-10-01 00:10:00

BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan -- A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying U.S millionaire scientist Gregory Olsen lifted off Saturday from the Central Asian steppe, launching the world's third space tourist on a two-day journey to the international space station. The rocket streaked off into the blue sky, trailing blindingly bright yellow and pink flames, as family and friends of Olsen and the two-member U.S.-Russian crew, as well as Russian and U.S. space officials, watched from a viewing platform at the...

2005-09-19 16:48:37

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON (Reuters) - NASA unveiled its $104 billion plan on Monday to return Americans to the moon by 2018 aboard a capsule-like vehicle the space agency's chief described as "Apollo on steroids." Like the Apollo program that carried the first humans to the moon in 1969, the new system would put crew members into a capsule sitting atop a rocket, and would have a separate heavy-lift vehicle to take only cargo into orbit. "It is very Apollo-like ... but bigger,"...

2005-09-19 13:07:20

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON (Reuters) - NASA on Monday unveiled its $104 billion plan to return Americans to the moon by 2018 aboard a capsule-like vehicle the space agency's chief described as "Apollo on steroids." Like the Apollo program that carried the first humans to the moon in 1969, the new system would put crew members into a capsule sitting atop a rocket, and would have a separate heavy-lift vehicle to take only cargo into orbit. "It is very Apollo-like ... but bigger,"...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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