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Latest Michael Marmot Stories

2010-02-11 14:19:55

Editorial: Getting to grips with health inequalities at last? Analysis: Bucking the inequality gradient through early child development Politicians from all parties must renew their commitment to tackling health inequalities if we are to create a fairer society, say researchers on bmj.com today. Their views come as an independent review by Professor Sir Michael Marmot is published, outlining the most effective strategies for reducing health inequalities in England from 2010. The review is...

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2009-02-26 13:28:30

A team of international researchers said on Thursday that healthier living could prevent about a third of the most common cancers in rich countries and about a quarter in poorer ones, Reuters reported. A new study which urged governments and individuals to do more to cut the number of global cancer deaths each year suggests that better diets, more exercise and controlling weight could also prevent more than 40 percent of colon and breast cancer cases in some countries. It suggested simple...

2008-09-24 03:00:09

By Putnam, Sara Galea, Sandro ABSTRACT In the past two decades, public health researchers have taken renewed interest in investigating the role of social factors in health. This holds substantial promise in terms of identifying manipulable social factors that are amenable to policy intervention. Most existing empirical and conceptual epidemiologic work, however, has focused on the more proximal social determinants, such as interpersonal relations. These factors, although perhaps easier to...

2008-09-01 18:00:25

By PETER ELSON IT ALWAYS astonishes me that in this tiny fogbound island built on a rocky outcrop of coal, there should be such a range of accents. Commuting eastwards by train from Liverpool the change in voices and, indeed, attitudes they embody always comes as a surprise. But the divisions run far deeper than that. Social inequalities create an astonishing difference in life expectancy for people who live just a few miles apart in many of our cities. The low, probable age of death...

2008-08-29 00:00:36

By James Macintyre People are dying "on a grand scale" around the world because of social injustice brought about by a "toxic" combination of bad policies, politics and economics, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said yesterday. Avoidable health problems caused by social factors - as opposed to biology and genetics - are causing large-scale health inequalities in the UK, the WHO's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health has found after a three-year study. Evidence showed that...

2008-08-27 03:00:24

By Anonymous Access Annual Meeting online program now and plan ahead SIR Michael Marmot, an internationally recognized leader on health inequalities, will be the keynote speaker at APHA's 136th Annual Meeting in San Diego, the Association announced in June. Marmot, PhD, MPH, MBBS, FRCP, FFPHM, FMedSci, will speak during this year's opening session, which will take place Sunday, Oct. 26, from noon to 2 p.m. Marmot is chair of the World Health Organization's Commission on Social...

2006-07-07 07:40:00

By Patricia Reaney LONDON -- The poorest in England are over 10 times more likely to die in their 50s than richer people despite receiving similar healthcare, researchers said. Obesity and smoking, two of the leading causes of preventable death, are more common in lower economic groups but Professor Michael Marmot of University College London said psychological factors and social position can also have an effect on health. "There is an intricate relationship between wealth and health," said...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.