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Latest Micro air vehicle Stories

2010-07-27 07:05:00

COLLEGE PARK, Md., July 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Not every engineering dean wants a live bee colony outside of his office, but such is the case at the Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. Researchers in a lab down the hall from the dean's office have situated the colony there so they have easy access to the bees. They are studying how the bees fly in order to enable micro air vehicles (MAV) to deal with unexpected wind changes. The MAVs someday...

2010-06-16 09:32:00

PHOENIX, June 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Honeywell (NYSE: HON) announced that its T-Hawk(TM) Micro Air Vehicle, the only fielded unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with hover and stare surveillance capability, has recorded its 10,000th flight since introduction. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20080425/LAF040LOGO) (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20080425/LAF040LOGO) The 10,000th flight was part of an Explosive Ordinance Disposal evaluation exercise in Iraq....

2009-10-14 08:00:00

SAN JOSE, Calif., Oct. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Gumstix, Inc. today announced that one of its global customers, the PIXHAWK Micro Air Vehicle Team, won the Indoor Autonomy Competition at the European Micro Air Vehicle Conference (EMAV) 2009 held in The Netherlands on September 17th, 2009. For its image processing, the PIXHAWK entry called the "PIXHAWK Pioneer" used the OMAP3530 processor-based Gumstix Overo(TM) Fire computer-on-module (COM) as its main onboard computer. The EMAV conference...

2009-07-08 09:52:17

U.S. researchers say they used real bats as the inspiration for a new type of military surveillance drone equipped with wings that flap. The micro-aerial vehicle, developed at North Carolina State University, is used to monitor activities on the ground and detect biological weapons. It was designed with a lightweight skeleton and mechanical muscle system similar to a bat's and can be used to monitor movements on the ground or detect the presence of biological weapons. We have used a...

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2009-07-07 12:40:00

Tiny flying machines can be used for everything from indoor surveillance to exploring collapsed buildings, but simply making smaller versions of planes and helicopters doesn't work very well. Instead, researchers at North Carolina State University are mimicking nature's small flyers "“ and developing robotic bats that offer increased maneuverability and performance.Small flyers, or micro-aerial vehicles (MAVs), have garnered a great deal of interest due to their potential applications...

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2009-06-11 13:55:00

The twirling seeds of maple trees spin like miniature helicopters as they fall to the ground. Because the seeds descend slowly as they swirl, they can be carried aloft by the wind and dispersed over great distances. Just how the seeds manage to fall so slowly, however, has mystified scientists.In research published in the June 12 issue of the journal Science, researchers from Wageningen University in the Netherlands and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) describe the aerodynamic...

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2008-02-04 17:50:00

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Natural flyers like birds, bats and insects outperform man-made aircraft in aerobatics and efficiency. University of Michigan engineers are studying these animals as a step toward designing flapping-wing planes with wingspans smaller than a deck of playing cards. A Blackbird jet flying nearly 2,000 miles per hour covers 32 body lengths per second. But a common pigeon flying at 50 miles per hour covers 75. The roll rate of the aerobatic A-4 Skyhawk plane is about 720...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'