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Latest microbiologist Stories

2011-09-09 11:25:09

With the increasing availability of sophisticated technologies to rapidly diagnose and treat infectious diseases, the duties and the role of clinical laboratory microbiologists, who traditionally perform these tests, could see significant changes in the next few years. That is one of the conclusions of a series of reports published in a special supplement to the September 2011 Journal of Clinical Microbiology. "This is a very exciting and dynamic period for clinical microbiology: not only...

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2011-06-09 05:20:00

A Harvard expert in cultural heritage microbiology reports that a "fingerprint" left behind by ancient Egyptian microbes might indicate that King Tut's burial was conducted hastily. The pharaoh's tomb includes elaborately painted walls covered with dark brown spots that mar almost every surface.  However, despite nearly a century of scientific investigation, the precise identity of these spots remains a mystery.  So Harvard microbiologist Ralph Mitchell set out to find an...

2011-01-26 14:18:14

It's commonly known, at least among microbiologists, that microbes have an additional option to living or dying "” dormancy. Dormant microbes are less like zombies and more like hibernating bears. What isn't known, however, is how large numbers of dormant microorganisms affect the natural environments when they act as microbial seed banks. In the current issue of Nature Reviews: Microbiology, Jay Lennon, Michigan State University assistant professor of microbiology and molecular...

2010-12-02 22:05:48

New cooperative behavior, interspecies electron transfer; identified in anaerobic bacteria University of Massachusetts Amherst microbiologists Derek Lovley, Zarath Summers and colleagues report in the Dec. 2 issue of Science that they have discovered a new cooperative behavior in anaerobic bacteria, known as interspecies electron transfer, that could have important implications for the global carbon cycle and bioenergy. The scientists found that microorganisms of different species, in this...

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2010-09-23 11:12:49

Candida albicans, a fungus that kills more than 10,000 people with weakened immune systems each year, grows more dangerous as it forms and extends long strands of cells called hyphal filaments. In a paper published this month, UT Health Science Center San Antonio microbiologists describe a key factor involved in this damaging growth. This finding may eventually lead to targets for antifungal strategies, the scientists said. Patricia Carlisle, a Ph.D. student at the Health Science Center, and...

2010-09-20 15:44:20

Spoilage bacteria that can cause red coloration of pickles' skin during fermentation may actually help clean up dyes in textile industry wastewater, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study. Some species of Lactobacilli-food-related microorganisms-can cause red coloring when combined with tartrazine, a yellow food-coloring agent used in the manufacture of dill pickles. Now Agricultural Research Service (ARS) microbiologist Ilenys P©rez-Díaz and her...

2010-06-14 15:08:14

Findings released at the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Research by a small group of microbiologists is revealing how marine microbes live in a mysterious area of the Earth: the realm just beneath the deep ocean floor. The ocean crust may be the largest biological reservoir on our planet. Beth Orcutt, a post-doctoral fellow at Aarhus University in Denmark and the University of Southern California, presented her new findings about this little researched...

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2010-04-20 14:26:28

An Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist may have found a way to cut the amount of ammonia produced by cattle. To do it, he's using a key ingredient of the brewer's art: hops. Cattle, deer, sheep, goats and other ruminant animals depend on a slew of naturally occurring bacteria to aid digestion of grass and other fibrous plants in the first of their four stomach chambers, known as the rumen. The problem, according to ARS microbiologist Michael Flythe, comes from one group of bacteria,...

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2010-01-20 10:25:00

Why does an apple a day keep the doctor away? New research published in the open access journal BMC Microbiology contributes to our understanding of why eating apples is good for you. Microbiologists from the National Food Institute at the University of Denmark fed rats on a diet that was rich in whole apples, apple juice, pur©e or pomace, or put them on a control diet. They then analyzed the microbial content of the rats' digestive systems to see if eating apples had any impact on the...

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2009-07-04 09:00:00

The newest revolution in microbiology testing walks on four legs and says "baa."It's the hair sheep, a less-hirsute version of the familiar woolly barnyard resident. A new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine, which is to be published July 3 in PLoS ONE, finds that not only are these ruminants low-maintenance and parasite-resistant, they're also perfect blood donors for the microbiology tests necessary to diagnose infectious disease in the developing world.Identifying...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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