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Latest microbiologist Stories

2008-07-24 03:00:21

By Wood, Marcia If pathogens like E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella had a motto for survival, it might be: "Find! Bind! Multiply!" That pretty much sums up what these food-poisoning bacteria do in nature, moving through our environment to find a host they can bind to and use as a staging area for multiplying and spreading. But ARS food-safety scientists in California are determined to find out how to stop these and other foodborne pathogenic bacteria in their tracks, before the microbes can...

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2008-03-27 00:10:00

Looking out over the low green mountains jutting through miles of placid waterways here in southern Chile, it is hard to imagine that anything could be amiss. But beneath the rows of neatly laid netting around the fish farms just off the shore, the salmon are dying. A virus called infectious salmon anemia, or ISA, is killing millions of salmon destined for export to Japan, Europe and the United States. The spreading plague has sent shivers through Chile's third-largest industry, which has...

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2008-03-27 09:40:00

Scientists know more today than ever before about the microbes that inhabit our mouths. They know so much, in fact, that gathering all of the relevant bits of information into one place when designing experiments can be a job in itself. Now, grantees of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health, and their international colleagues intend to solve this problem with the launch of the first comprehensive database of the oral...

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2007-04-05 07:54:40

Microbiologists are rethinking the ways in which they define and classify microbial species. Studying microbes and understanding how they are related to one another throughout evolutionary time is important in determining how life originated on our planet. ASM -- Until a decade ago, scientists categorized microorganisms almost exclusively by their physical characteristics: how they looked, what they ate, and the by-products they produced. With the advent of genomic sequencing and genetic...

2006-05-11 07:10:00

By Tan Ee Lyn HONG KONG -- Scientists in Thailand have detected live H5N1 bird flu virus in the blood of a boy who died in December, a discovery that might lead to a safer way to diagnose the disease in humans. At present, respiratory secretions are collected to test for the H5N1 virus. But that practice, which is physically irritating, can result in the patient coughing violently and spraying the virus, infecting doctors and nurses conducting the procedure. During SARS in Hong Kong in 2003,...

2006-05-10 03:20:00

By Tan Ee Lyn HONG KONG (Reuters) - Scientists in Thailand have detected live H5N1 bird flu virus in the blood of a boy who died in December, a discovery that might lead to a safer way to diagnose the disease in humans. At present, respiratory secretions are collected to test for the H5N1 virus. But that practice, which is physically irritating, can result in the patient coughing violently and spraying the virus, infecting doctors and nurses conducting the procedure. During SARS in Hong Kong...

2005-09-22 15:52:45

Scientists are now revisiting, and perhaps revising, their thinking about how Archaea, an ancient kingdom of single-celled microorganisms, are involved in maintaining the global balance of nitrogen and carbon. Researchers have discovered the first Archaea known to oxidize ammonia for energy and metabolize carbon dioxide by successfully growing the tentatively named, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, in the lab. "Data from several cultivation-independent, molecular experiments led us to suspect that...

2005-06-23 18:55:00

AMHERST, Mass. "“ Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have discovered a tiny biological structure that is highly electrically conductive. This breakthrough helps describe how microorganisms can clean up groundwater and produce electricity from renewable resources. It may also have applications in the emerging field of nanotechnology, which develops advanced materials and devices in extremely small dimensions. The findings of microbiologist Derek R. Lovley's research...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'