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How Does The Immune System Protect Children From Malaria

How Does The Immune System Protect Children From Malaria?

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases According to a study published today in PLOS Pathogens, children who live in regions of the world where malaria is common can mount an immune response to infection with malaria parasites...

Latest Microbiology Stories

2014-04-18 16:23:24

HARRISBURG, Pa., April 18, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Consumers who purchased raw milk from Greenfield Dairy, 1450 Tittle Road, Middleburg, should discard it immediately due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today said raw milk collected during required routine sampling by a commercial laboratory on April 8 tested positive for the bacteria. Greenfield Dairy owned by Paul Weaver, sells directly to consumers at an...

2014-04-18 12:38:12

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. Led by U. of I. chemistry professor Eric Oldfield, the team determined the different ways the drug SQ109 attacks the tuberculosis bacterium, how the drug can be tweaked to target other pathogens from yeast to malaria –...

2014-04-18 11:26:27

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. Jeffrey S. Kieft, PhD, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics at the School of Medicine and an early career scientist with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and colleagues recently published articles in the scholarly...

2014-04-18 09:57:20

Expert says reducing lactose malabsorption by adding lactase to milk may reduce the amount of gas in the infant gut, thereby resulting in a reduction of colic symptoms Colic affects about one in five infants in the United States annually and accounts for numerous pediatric visits during the first several months after birth. Research into probiotic use for reduction of colic symptoms was showing promise; however, the April 1, 2014 issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ2014;348:g2107;...

2014-04-17 11:34:30

Trans-generational defense mechanism in humans proved Children who have been conceived during a severe epidemic are more resistant against other pathogens later in life. For the first time this has been proved by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) in Rostock, Germany, for the 18th century epidemics of measles and smallpox in the Canadian province of Québec. Children who were conceived during the wave of measles in 1714 and 1715 died significantly less...

Newest Analysis For Human Microbiome Project Re-defines What's Healthy
2014-04-17 08:54:25

[ Watch The Video: Scientists Re-Define What’s Healthy In New Human Microbiome Project Analysis ] University of Michigan Health System Study in Nature shows wide variation in the collection of bacteria harbored by healthy adults As scientists catalog the trillions of bacteria found in every nook and cranny of the human body, a new look by the University of Michigan shows wide variation in the types of bacteria found in healthy people. Based on their findings in today's...

2014-04-16 23:06:57

Officials at Clearstream, LLC, who previously spoke out about MRSA’s prevalence in athletic facilities, are now warning of the infection’s spread to communities. In order to prevent what is now a growing public health threat, Clearstream is advancing the first antimicrobial technology that actively provides long-term protection without the use of harmful poisons. Harrisburg, NC (PRWEB) April 16, 2014 Historically, MRSA infections were relegated to sick patients in hospitals and...

2014-04-16 23:02:09

A novel antiviral drug may protect people infected with the measles from getting sick and prevent them from spreading the virus to others, an international team of researchers says. Scientists from the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, the Emory Institute for Drug Development and the Paul-Ehrlich Institute in Germany developed the drug and tested it in animals infected with a virus closely related to one that causes the measles. Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) April 16,...

2014-04-16 23:02:05

Imagine No Malaria asks supporters to #CovertheNet to raise awareness across social media about this killer disease that claims the life of a child every 60 seconds. Nashville, TN (PRWEB) April 16, 2014 Imagine No Malaria Asks Supporters to “Cover the ‘Net” for World Malaria Day As World Malaria Day approaches on April 25, Imagine No Malaria is asking supporters to #CovertheNet to raise awareness across social media networks about this killer disease that claims the life of a child...

Symbiosis Between Beewolves And Their Protective Bacteria Originated Millions Of Years Ago
2014-04-16 14:43:12

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Like humans, many animals depend on beneficial microbes for survival. Although such symbioses can persist for millions of years, the factors maintaining their long-term stability remain, in most cases, unknown. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the University of Regensburg, in collaboration with researchers in the USA, now discovered that certain wasps tightly control mother-to-offspring transmission of their...


Latest Microbiology Reference Libraries

Culling
2013-08-21 08:18:13

Culling is a term used for separating the good from the bad and discarding the bad with the cull being the rejected items. Culling is used to improve the desired group with specific characteristics to improve the group. Culling is used for strengthening a livestock herd and the culled animals are destroyed. When breeding pedigree animals, the culled are spayed or neutered. This prevents the undesirable trait of the animal from being bred with other animals.  Plant life is also...

Pompeii Worm, Alvinella pompejana
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) is a species of polychaete worm, or bristle worm that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. It resides at hydrothermal vents, making it an extremophile, and was first discovered French marine biologists of the coat of the Galapagos Islands in the 1980s. It was described by Lucien Laubier and Daniel Desbruyeres as a deep-sea polychaete that could withstand extreme amounts of heat. The Pompeii worm can reach an average length of up to five inches and is...

Soybean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera glycines
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is a parasitic worm that infects soybean plants, and other legumes, across the world. It is thought to be native to Asia, but was found in the United States in 1954 and in Colombia in the 1980’s. It can be found in Italy and Iran and its most recent sightings have occurred in Brazil and Argentina, two major areas where soybeans are grown. These worms are highly damaging to American soybean crops, costing the industry as much as 500 thousand...

Paralvinella sulfincola
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paralvinella sulfincola is a species of worm in the Alvinellidae family. It lives among undersea hot-water vents, thriving in the hottest of waters, at temperatures that would kill most animals. This characteristic makes it an extremophile or hyperthermophile. Having the unique ability to withstand extremely hot water from hydrothermal openings enables this stalk-like worm to feed on bacteria that other animals cannot reach. It is difficult to know exactly what temperatures this species...

Cell (journal)
2012-06-04 14:15:36

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal founded by Benjamin Lewin in January 1974 with the sponsorship of MIT Press. Lewin bought the rights to the journal in 1986 and published it under his own publishing arm Cell Press. Cell Press was sold to Elsevier in 1999, which currently publishes Cell twice monthly. Cell Press publishes several biomedical journals, including Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Molecular Cell, Developmental Cell, Cancer Cell, Current Biology, Structure, Chemistry &...

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