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Microbes Can Create Dripstones On Earth And Potentially On

Microbes Can Create Dripstones On Earth, And Potentially On Mars And Other Planets

University of Southern Denmark According to new research humble, microscopic organisms can create dripstones in caves. This illustrates how biological life can influence the formation of Earth’s geology - and the same may be happening right...

Latest Microorganism Stories

diet gut flora
2014-07-30 05:21:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has been evident for a while that men and women react to diet differently. Men lose weight easier than women, men need more calories than women because of muscle mass, and there are even differences in eating styles. Now, a new study led by The University of Texas at Austin reveals that even our gut microbes react differently to our diet, even if that diet is exactly the same. The findings, published in Nature Communication,...

2014-07-21 09:36:54

Harvard University Researchers study cheese to unlock secrets of how microbial communities form Go ahead and call Rachel Dutton's research cheesy if you must. As far as she's concerned, it's anything but an insult. A Bauer Fellow at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences' Center for Systems Biology, Dutton and her lab study cheese – or more precisely – the bacteria and fungi that live on cheese, in an effort to better understand how microbial communities form. After studying 137...

Researchers Identify Disease That May Have Plagued 700-year-old Skeleton
2014-07-15 03:40:49

American Society for Microbiology European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village. Reporting this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, the authors describe using a technique called shotgun metagenomics to sequence DNA from a calcified nodule in the pelvic region of a middle-aged male skeleton excavated from the settlement of...

ocean microbe shift workers
2014-07-12 05:05:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Like humans, ocean microbes have their own daily life cycles, following predictable patterns of eating, breathing, growing and other biological activity, according to new research published in the July 11 edition of the journal Science. As part of the study, scientists from MIT, the University of Hawaii, the University of Georgia, the Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering at Nanyang Technological University...

Ocean's Most Abundant Organisms Have Clear Daily Cycles
2014-07-11 03:04:06

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Coordinated timing may have implications for energy transformation, ocean food web Imagine the open ocean as a microbial megacity, teeming with life too small to be seen. In every drop of water, hundreds of types of bacteria can be found.  Now scientists have discovered that communities of these ocean microbes have their own daily cycles—not unlike the residents of a bustling city who tend to wake up, commute, work, and eat at the same times....

2014-07-07 10:23:08

BGI Shenzhen Researchers from BGI, working within the Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract (MetaHIT) project, and in collaboration with other institutions around the world , have established the highest quality integrated gene set for the human gut microbiome to date- a close-to-complete catalogue of the microbes that reside inside us and massively outnumber our own cells. While the roughly 20,000 genes in the human genome have been available for over a decade, the gene catalog of...

human intestinal flora
2014-07-07 04:50:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have discovered 500 previously unidentified microorganisms in human intestinal flora, as well as 800 new types of viruses that attack intestinal bacteria. In addition, DTU Systems Biology professor Søren Brunak, associate professor Henrik Bjørn Nielsen and their colleagues devised a new principle for analyzing DNA sequence data in order to map the newly discovered...

Unknown Microbes Grown One By One Using New Technique
2014-06-25 03:39:00

Jessica Stoller-Conrad, Caltech A new technique developed at Caltech helps grow individual species of the unknown microbes that live in the human body. Trillions of bacteria live in and on the human body; a few species can make us sick, but many others keep us healthy by boosting digestion and preventing inflammation. Although there's plenty of evidence that these microbes play a collective role in human health, we still know very little about most of the individual bacterial species...

Sharing A Common Microbiological Connection To Our Mobile Phones
2014-06-24 13:12:03

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online We might be more connected to our mobile phones than we think. According to recent research, such phones reflect a significant microbiological connection with their owners. The study focused on the collection of microorganisms on the items worn or carried by a person regularly. In a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation workshop in Princeton, New Jersey, researchers from the University of Oregon sequenced microbes from the dominant-hand...

2014-06-17 12:37:42

American Society for Microbiology Fecal microbiota transplantation --- the process of delivering stool bacteria from a healthy donor to a patient suffering from intestinal infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile --- works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to the recipient's gut, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The study provides insight into the structural and potential...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.