Quantcast

Latest Microplasma Stories

Tiny Transistors Developed For Extreme Environs
2014-03-20 10:29:28

University of Utah University of Utah electrical engineers fabricated the smallest plasma transistors that can withstand high temperatures and ionizing radiation found in a nuclear reactor. Such transistors someday might enable smartphones that take and collect medical X-rays on a battlefield, and devices to measure air quality in real time. "These plasma-based electronics can be used to control and guide robots to conduct tasks inside the nuclear reactor," says Massood Tabib-Azar, a...

Case Western Reserve University Makes Nanodiamonds In Ambient Conditions
2013-10-21 09:19:46

Case Western Reserve University Opens door for flexible electronics, implants and more Instead of having to use tons of crushing force and volcanic heat to forge diamonds, researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed a way to cheaply make nanodiamonds on a lab bench at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature. The nanodiamonds are formed directly from a gas and require no surface to grow on. The discovery holds promise for many uses in technology and...

Microplasma Device Could Revolutionize Archaeology
2013-09-07 03:58:07

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A team of researchers, including experts from Uppsala University in Sweden have developed a miniature device that they claim could revolutionize the way in which archaeologists date objects they discover in the field. The instrument in question is being described as a high-tech microplasma source that is capable of exciting matter in a controlled, efficient way. While the device, which is detailed in a paper appearing in the...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
Related