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Latest Microsatellite instability Stories

2012-07-19 02:37:48

The Cancer Genome Atlas generates genomic data for colon and rectal cancers that point to potential targets for treatment The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project's large-scale study of colon and rectal cancer tissue specimens. In multiple types of...

2011-05-18 15:19:22

Mayo Clinic has developed a screening procedure that could dramatically increase testing for Lynch syndrome (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/lynch-syndrome/DS00669), a hereditary genetic disorder that raises cancer risk, particularly for colorectal cancer. An estimated 3 percent of colon cancers can be attributed to Lynch syndrome. At least 80 percent of people with Lynch syndrome develop colorectal cancer (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/colon-cancer/DS00035), many of them before age 50....

2011-04-25 14:54:44

15 percent of colorectal cancers have mutation that responds to PARP inhibitors A class of drugs that shows promise in breast and ovarian cancers with BRCA gene mutations could potentially benefit colorectal cancer patients with a different genetic mutation, a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds. Working in cell lines from colorectal cancer patients, researchers found that a new class of drugs called PARP inhibitors worked against tumors with mutations...

2010-07-01 10:49:21

Smoking, an established risk factor for colon cancer, may induce specific epigenetic changes and gene mutations that may be involved in the development of colon cancer, according to an online study published June 29 in the Journal of The National Cancer Institute. Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer, with a recent meta-analysis estimating that people who currently smoke or smoked in the past are 18% more likely to develop colorectal cancer than non-smokers. But few...

2010-04-30 12:19:18

New research shows for the first time that molecules called microRNA can silence genes that protect the genome from cancer-causing mutations. The study, led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, shows that microRNA-155 (miR-155) can inhibit the activity of genes that normally correct the damage when the wrong bases are paired in DNA. The loss or silencing of these genes, which are...

2010-02-10 08:58:28

Gastric cancer, one of the most common types of cancer, is associated with high mortality rates. In the last decades, a decrease in the worldwide incidence has been observed with some changes in the therapeutic and diagnostic options. However, the prognosis for this disease still remains poor, mainly when the diagnosis is performed at advanced stages. The therapy most effective is still surgical resection and in a significant number of cases, especially in the advanced stage, it is only...

2009-06-11 09:56:07

Checkpoint with forkhead and ring finger (CHFR) is a mitotic stress checkpoint gene whose promoter is frequently methylated in various kinds of cancer. In gastric cancer, CHFR promoter hypermethylation has been reported to lead to chromosome instability (CIN) and genetic instability is one of the hallmarks of human cancer.A research team led by Dr Eiji Oki from Kyushu University examined the methylation status of the promoter region of CHFR and microsatellite instability (MIN) status in...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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