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Latest Microtubule Stories

34582517d05daebe55988366faa507ce1
2010-02-18 12:55:00

Life's smallest motor, a protein that shuttles cargo within cells and helps cells divide, does so by rocking up and down like a seesaw, according to research conducted by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Brandeis University. The researchers created high-resolution snapshots of a protein motor, called kinesin, as it walked along a microtubule, which are tube-shaped structures that form a cell's "skeleton." The result is the closest look...

2009-12-06 13:51:03

Structurally, functionally different cell component replaces injured part Studies with fruit flies have shown that the specialized nerve cells called neurons can rebuild themselves after injury. These results, potentially relevant to research efforts to improve the treatment of patients with traumatic nerve damage or neurodegenerative disease, were presented at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 49th Annual Meeting, Dec. 5-9, 2009 in San Diego. An injured neuron's remarkable ability...

d42062ea4ed48874a76c016665932faa1
2009-08-17 16:25:00

"A biologist, a physicist, and a nanotechnologist walk into a ..." sounds like the start of a joke. Instead, it was the start of a collaboration that has helped to decipher a critical, but so far largely unstudied, phase of how cells divide. Errors in cell division can cause mutations that lead to cancer, and this study could shed light on the role of chromosome abnormalities in uncontrolled cell replication.The biologist in question is University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Associate...

7be48c22c84e34c5e0d37b64a7f42f0b1
2009-08-14 10:00:00

Friction is the force that resists the relative motion of two bodies in contact. The same is true on the nanoscale: Molecular motors have to fight the friction created between them and their tracks. However, since the frictional forces acting on such motors had not been measured before, it was not known how they depend on the speed and the direction of motion.Friction Slows Down ProteinsScientists in Dresden at the Biotechnology Center (BIO-TEC) of the Technical University of Dresden and at...

d39b5823857c5ae37d5475ab1636027b1
2009-06-15 09:55:00

Study shows stalled microtubules might be responsible for some cases of the neurological disorder Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseaseStalled microtubules might be responsible for some cases of the neurological disorder Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, Tanabe and Takei report in the June 15, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org). A mutant protein makes the microtubules too stable to perform their jobs, the researchers find.The mutations behind CMT disease slow nerve impulses,...

2009-03-23 08:28:55

U.S. scientists say they are studying motor proteins as possible nanoscale machines for drug delivery inside the body's cells. Pennsylvania State University Associate Professor William Hancock said motor proteins, which transport chromosomes, mitochondria or bundles of proteins within cells, might be used to deliver drugs or even help inhibit tumor growth. Hancock said most motor proteins contain two motor domains, or heads, attached to a shared cargo-binding domain, or tail. Think of it as a...

9ef6118a4d9055f6ef94e106114bf03d1
2009-02-09 07:23:24

The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong, diseases such as cancer can arise. Scientists have tried for years to...

2009-02-05 14:50:30

An international team of scientists led by the University of Leeds has shed new light on the little-understood motor protein called dynein, thought to be involved in progressive neurological disorders such as motor neurone disease. Researchers from the University's Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and from the University of Tokyo have for the first time identified key elements of dynein's structure, and the winch-like mechanism by which it moves. The research "“ funded by...

2009-01-09 12:04:51

A group of Dartmouth researchers has found a new function for one of the proteins involved with chromosome segregation during cell division. Their finding adds to the growing knowledge about the fundamental workings of cells, and contributes to understanding how cell function can go wrong, as it does with cancerous cells.The researchers studied a protein called NOD, distantly related to the motor proteins that power diverse cellular activities, including intracellular transport, signaling,...

57aa57be0e2dcc951ba6e561d13d1e3f1
2008-03-19 14:20:00

Max Planck scientists shed light on transport mechanism in cellsLogistics is a key part of life. Nutrition, tools and information constantly have to be transported from one place to another in cells. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces have now discovered how molecular motors transport cargos in cells. Two competing teams of motors pull in opposite directions, like in a tug-of-war contest. The winning team determines the direction of transport after the...


Latest Microtubule Reference Libraries

Arbacia punctulata
2013-11-06 11:08:03

Arbacia punctulata is a species of Arbacia genus of purple-spined sea urchins. Its natural habitat is in the Western Atlantic Ocean. It can be found in shallow water from Massachusetts to Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula, from Texas to Florida in the Gulf of Mexico, the coast from Panama to French Guiana and in the Lesser Antilles, normally on sandy, rocky, or shelly bottoms. It is omnivorous, consuming a wide variety of preys. It’s been shown that it is galactolipids, rather than...

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