Quantcast

Latest Microtubule Stories

9ef6118a4d9055f6ef94e106114bf03d1
2009-02-09 07:23:24

The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong, diseases such as cancer can arise. Scientists have tried for years to...

2009-02-05 14:50:30

An international team of scientists led by the University of Leeds has shed new light on the little-understood motor protein called dynein, thought to be involved in progressive neurological disorders such as motor neurone disease. Researchers from the University's Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and from the University of Tokyo have for the first time identified key elements of dynein's structure, and the winch-like mechanism by which it moves. The research "“ funded by...

2009-01-09 12:04:51

A group of Dartmouth researchers has found a new function for one of the proteins involved with chromosome segregation during cell division. Their finding adds to the growing knowledge about the fundamental workings of cells, and contributes to understanding how cell function can go wrong, as it does with cancerous cells.The researchers studied a protein called NOD, distantly related to the motor proteins that power diverse cellular activities, including intracellular transport, signaling,...

57aa57be0e2dcc951ba6e561d13d1e3f1
2008-03-19 14:20:00

Max Planck scientists shed light on transport mechanism in cellsLogistics is a key part of life. Nutrition, tools and information constantly have to be transported from one place to another in cells. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces have now discovered how molecular motors transport cargos in cells. Two competing teams of motors pull in opposite directions, like in a tug-of-war contest. The winning team determines the direction of transport after the...

4459a03b9d39334ab8ed917847ba04ba1
2006-08-09 17:06:56

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- How life takes shape is a mystery. Butterfly or baby, cells organize themselves into tissues, tissues form organs, organs become organisms. Over and over, patterns emerge in all living creatures. Spiders get eight legs. Leopards get spots. Every nautilus is encased in an elegant spiral shell. This phenomenon of pattern formation is critical in developmental biology. But the forces that govern it are far from clear. Alan Turing, father of modern computer science,...

499f1ca2ebc268732b1891ff56fe1ef51
2006-04-25 19:00:17

UA's nanotechnology research group is using proteins from living cells to "grow" wires on microchips. Their work promises to revolutionize the way microchips are made by combining biology and electronics "” leading to smaller, faster and more efficient circuits for cell phones, computers, MP3 players and a thousand other microelectronic devices. But that's only one of the benefits of this research. The work holds promise in several areas, such as improving testing methods for anticancer...

2005-08-03 15:40:00

Santa Barbara, Calif.) "“ Materials scientists working with biologists at the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed "smart" bio-nanotubes "” with open or closed ends "” that could be developed for drug or gene delivery applications. The nanotubes are "smart" because in the future they could be designed to encapsulate and then open up to deliver a drug or gene in a particular location in the body. The scientists found that by manipulating the electrical...

2005-06-22 12:50:00

BERKELEY, CA "“ Microtubules are active protein polymers critical to the structure and function of cells and the process of cell division. In a living cell their growing ends constantly elongate and retreat in a thrashing frenzy of polymerization and depolymerization, like the writhing snakes of Medusa's hair. Known prosaically as "dynamic instability," this ongoing rapid growth and shrinkage is key to the diverse workings of microtubules in the cell.  For the first time,...


Latest Microtubule Reference Libraries

Arbacia punctulata
2013-11-06 11:08:03

Arbacia punctulata is a species of Arbacia genus of purple-spined sea urchins. Its natural habitat is in the Western Atlantic Ocean. It can be found in shallow water from Massachusetts to Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula, from Texas to Florida in the Gulf of Mexico, the coast from Panama to French Guiana and in the Lesser Antilles, normally on sandy, rocky, or shelly bottoms. It is omnivorous, consuming a wide variety of preys. It’s been shown that it is galactolipids, rather than...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
Related