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Latest Midwifery Stories

2012-05-11 14:27:25

Induction of labor beyond 37 weeks of pregnancy can reduce perinatal mortality (death before, during or shortly after birth) without increasing caesarean section rates.

2012-05-02 09:52:59

A scheme supporting newly graduated, unemployed, and retired midwives to work in rural areas of Nigeria and provide essential obstetric care has helped to improve maternal, newborn, and child health and could potentially serve as a model for other low-income countries.

2012-04-20 10:21:35

Giving women who have previously given birth and who are at low risk of complications the opportunity to give birth at home or in a midwifery unit saves the NHS money, is safe for the baby and improves outcomes for the mother.

2012-04-11 22:09:44

A newly published article in the journal Nursing for Women's Health highlights the importance of a woman's ability to time her childbearing.

2012-04-06 11:06:17

In a letter published today on bmj.com, authors from Imperial College London NHS Healthcare Trust stress the importance of accurately capturing and coding patient episodes.

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2012-03-31 07:31:38

Researchers with the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered that women spend more time in labor today than they did five decades ago.


Latest Midwifery Reference Libraries

69_25ca82414f9e3d4dc58f4e0304b9dfb5
2011-04-28 17:02:45

Labor Induction is a process of giving an artificial start to birth with medical intervention or other methods. When an induction is not performed for emergency or other medical reasons, the method is considered an elective process. The decision to induce labor has increased in recent years due to its convenience or because it easily accommodates busy schedules. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, however, say that labor should only be induced when it is more risky...

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Word of the Day
mitraille
  • Small missiles, especially grape, canister, fragments of iron, and the like, when fired, as upon an enemy at close quarters.
  • To fire mitraille at.
The word 'mitraille' comes from the Old French 'mitaille', meaning 'small coins', sometimes used to mean 'scrap iron'.