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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 12:11 EDT

Latest Miguel Eckstein Stories

Accuracy Of Face Identification Is In The Eye And Brain Of The Beholder
2013-07-24 09:09:16

University of California - Santa Barbara Though humans generally have a tendency to look at a region just below the eyes and above the nose toward the midline when first identifying another person, a small subset of people tend to look further down -- at the tip of the nose, for instance, or at the mouth. However, as UC Santa Barbara researchers Miguel Eckstein and Matthew Peterson recently discovered, "nose lookers" and "mouth lookers" can do just as well as everyone else when it comes to...

Study Shows Where Scene Context Happens In Our Brain
2013-05-21 13:17:48

University of California - Santa Barbara In a remote fishing community in Venezuela, a lone fisherman sits on a cliff overlooking the southern Caribbean Sea. This man —— the lookout —— is responsible for directing his comrades on the water, who are too close to their target to detect their next catch. Using abilities honed by years of scanning the water's surface, he can tell by shadows, ripples, and even the behavior of seabirds, where the fish are schooling, and...

Scientist Break Down The Biology Of Gazes
2012-11-27 05:52:10

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) recently discovered that the best way to look at a person´s face is below their eyes, providing an explanation that is also linked to cultural background and other similar factors. "It's pretty fast, it's effortless —— we're not really aware of what we're doing," explained Miguel Eckstein, a professor of psychology in the Department of...

Brain Functions During Visual Searches Revealed
2012-07-17 09:10:02

You're headed out the door and you realize you don't have your car keys. After a few minutes of rifling through pockets, checking the seat cushions and scanning the coffee table, you find the familiar key ring and off you go. Easy enough, right? What you might not know is that the task that took you a couple seconds to complete is a task that computers —— despite decades of advancement and intricate calculations —— still can't perform as efficiently as humans: the...