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Latest Mike Parker Pearson Stories

Bones Found At Stonehenge Suggest It Was A Burial Ground
2013-03-10 06:12:59

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Theories about Stonehenge are nearly as old as the ancient monument itself and range from an astronomical calendar to an observatory of bygone days. Now, a team of researchers from the UK claim to have discovered evidence the stone structure started life as a massive burial ground. University College London (UCL) professor Mike Parker Pearson and colleagues unearthed over 50,000 cremated bone fragments belonging to 63 different...

Stonehenge Was A Monument Marking Unification Of Britain
2012-06-23 09:49:33

After 10 years of archaeological investigations, researchers have concluded that Stonehenge was built as a monument to unify the peoples of Britain, after a long period of conflict and regional difference between eastern and western Britain. Some stones came from southern England and others from West Wales. These stones are thought to have represented the ancestors of different groups from the earliest farming communities in Britain. Investigators from the universities of Sheffield,...

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2008-05-29 14:00:00

Researchers in Britain are discussing the possibility that Stonehenge may have been erected as an ancient burial ground for the royal family. Although archaeologists previously thought people were buried at the site between 2700 and 2600 B.C., Mike Parker Pearson, an archaeologist at the University of Sheffield, says radiocarbon dating of human remains at the site shows it was used as a cemetery just after 3000 B.C. until after the larger circle of stones were placed. "The hypothesis we are...

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2007-01-30 18:55:00

WASHINGTON -- A village of small houses that may have sheltered the builders of the mysterious Stonehenge - or people attending festivals there - has been found by archaeologists studying the stone circle in England. Eight of the houses, with central hearths, have been excavated, and there may be as many as 25 of them, Mike Parker Pearson said Tuesday at a briefing organized by the National Geographic Society. The ancient houses are at a site known as Durrington Walls, about two miles...

2006-10-21 18:00:21

By JIM MCBETH THE smiles and convivial air say it all. They are obviously all close friends or family, dressed in their best clothes and fine jewellery for a quiet get-together. It's the Bronze Age and the first Scots to introduce the social ritual of having people round for drinks are ready to party. Meet the ancestors the weekend wouldn't be the same without them. We take for granted the conviviality of Scottish culture, but it was defined 4,000 years ago by a mysterious race that,...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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