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Latest Military history of the United States Stories

2008-08-28 18:15:00

A former Marine was acquitted Thursday in California of killing four Iraqi civilians while he was a squadron leader. The verdict, reached after less than six hours of deliberations, was the first concerning a former soldier in a civilian court for alleged crimes committed in the military, The Riverside Press-Enterprise reported. Jose Luis Nazario Jr. was tried in federal court in Riverside because he had left the Marines. Nazario, who was a sergeant in the Marines, was charged with...

2008-07-27 03:00:30

By Richard Robbins, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Jul. 27--On a recent guided tour of the battlefield, David Miller, chief of education at Bushy Run, pointed out Edge Hill, where Bouquet's command spent the night of Aug. 5, and where, the morning of Aug. 6, they heard the battle cry of the enemy. This open, grassy field no longer resembles the colonial forest of 1763, but the topography is the same. Miller took note of the embankment that hid the retreating Redcoats from the warriors...

2008-07-13 03:00:20

By Carl Prine, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Jul. 13--During the Civil War, the Fort Pitt Foundry and Artillery Proving Grounds, located near today's Heinz History Center in the Strip District, cast what officers termed a "monster cannon." Twenty inches at the mouth, 20 feet in length, weighing nearly 117,000 pounds and able to hurl a half-ton projectile 5 miles, the U.S. Army piece was turned out in 1864. It remains one of the largest cannons ever forged in the United States and required...

2008-06-27 12:02:56

By Lohr McKinstry, The Press-Republican, Plattsburgh, N.Y. Jun. 27--TICONDEROGA -- Gen. George Washington spoke on Ticonderoga's Town Green Friday. Washington was portrayed by historical interpreter Dean Malissa of Philadelphia in an appearance that was jointly sponsored by the Town of Ticonderoga and Fort Ticonderoga. Arriving via horse-drawn carriage with another famous military figure, Gen. Henry Knox, portrayed by Robert Huffman, Washington spoke to a crowd of about 35 people...

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2007-05-17 00:05:00

PITTSBURGH - About two weeks ago, archaeologist Tom Kutys thought he'd found a stone wall when he came across mortared capstones in a trench at the state park that once was the site of French and British forts. Instead, archaeologists at Point State Park believe they very well might have uncovered long-buried remnants of Fort Duquesne, Pittsburgh's original fort. "If we are correct about this, we are looking at the earliest example of European masonry in Pittsburgh," said Brooke Blades, an...

2006-11-26 09:00:19

By David Venditta and Linda O'Connell, The Morning Call, Allentown, Pa. Nov. 26--Second of a three-day series "I heard the bullets whistle, and, believe me there is something charming in the sound," 22-year-old Lt. Col. George Washington wrote to his younger brother Jack on May 31, 1754. Those shots -- Washington's first brush with combat -- were fired three days earlier in a glen near southwestern Pennsylvania's Laurel Ridge. They ignited the French and Indian War and a period of...

2006-08-06 08:45:00

By Kristin Roberts WASHINGTON -- Gays in the U.S. military face regular hostility on some bases and ships where commanders fail to prohibit harassment more than a decade after the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" law was enacted, although seeds of greater tolerance may be taking root, advocates and witnesses report. While some leaders have created environments where harassment is not tolerated, others have not and the evidence, according to witnesses, is both verbal and visual. On the Navy's USS...

2006-06-28 14:30:45

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Pentagon no longer deems homosexuality a mental disorder, officials said on Wednesday, although the reversal has no impact on U.S. policy prohibiting openly gay people from serving in the military. After a 1996 Pentagon document placing homosexuality among a list of "certain mental disorders" came to light this month, the American Psychiatric Association and a handful of lawmakers asked the Defense Department to change its view. The Pentagon...

2006-04-16 10:52:19

By Parisa Hafezi TEHRAN (Reuters) - Some 200 Iranians have volunteered in the past few days to carry out "martyrdom missions" against U.S. and British interests if Iran is attacked over its nuclear program, a hardline group said on Sunday. The United States and other Western nations accuse Iran of seeking to master enrichment technology to build atomic weapons, a charge Iran denies. Washington says it wants a diplomatic solution, but has not ruled out a military option. Mohammad Ali...

2006-03-01 17:23:20

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. Navy warship helped rescue the six crewmen of an Iranian commercial boat in the Gulf after the small craft had been adrift without power for 10 days, the Navy said on Wednesday. The rescue at sea came when tensions remain high between Tehran and Western nations over what Washington charges are attempts by Iran to develop nuclear weapons. The Navy said the crew of the guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez, deployed in the Gulf in support of joint maritime...