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Latest Mimicry Stories

Cheats Of The Bird World
2013-09-25 08:49:56

University of Exeter Cuckoo finches that lay more than one egg in their victims' nests have a better chance of bamboozling host parents into fostering their parasitic young, a study has found. Dr Martin Stevens from the University of Exeter and Dr Claire Spottiswoode from the University of Cambridge, with Dr Jolyon Troscianko at the University of Exeter, demonstrated that when African cuckoo finch females lay more than one egg in the same nest of their African tawny-flanked prinia...

Effectiveness Of Camouflage Types
2013-09-11 11:08:04

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online From military personnel to potential prey, camouflage has proven to be an effective way to evade detection. However, a new study from the University of Exeter has found that some ‘predators’ can learn to read certain types of camouflage more easily than other types. Using human volunteers as their 'predators' in a video game-like simulation, study researchers discovered that high contrast markings on virtual moths, similar to the...

Honeyguide Birds Destroy Their Own Species' Eggs To Eliminate Competition
2013-08-21 09:19:04

University of Cambridge Scientists believe behavior drives evolution of egg size similar to hosts Like cuckoos, honeyguides are parasitic birds that lay their eggs in other birds' nests and dupe them into raising their young. Now scientists reveal that, unlike in cuckoos, the resemblance between honeyguide eggs and those of their bee-eater bird hosts hasn't evolved to trick hosts into accepting the imposter egg as one of their own. Rather, it appears to have evolved to trick other...

Plant Distress Signals Can Attract Enemies
2013-07-02 15:02:35

Frontiers Plants that emit an airborne distress signal in response to herbivory may actually attract more enemies, according to a new study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Plant Science. A team of researchers from Switzerland found that the odor released by maize plants under attack by insects attract not only parasitic wasps, which prey on herbivorous insects, but also caterpillars of the Egyptian cotton leafworm moth Spodoptera littoralis, a species that feeds on...

How Do Cicadas Make Sound
2013-05-31 14:58:53

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists are looking into how cicadas are able to make those extraordinarily loud sounds that annoy us all throughout the summer. A research team from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) looked into cicadas' unique ability to produce these loud noises, which paves the way to make devices that would mimic it for remote sensing underwater, ship-to-ship communications, rescue operations and other applications. Scientists...

Sea Lion Learns To Boogie Down
2013-04-02 04:56:19

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The first empirical evidence of an animal not capable of vocal mimicry that can keep the beat comes from a California sea lion that bobs her head in time to music. The findings of this study, published online in the Journal of Comparative Psychology, challenge current scientific theories, according to the authors. Those theories hold the ability to synchronize movements with sound is associated with the same brain mechanisms that...

Butterfly Evolution Can Also Be Driven By Spiders
2013-03-13 05:09:24

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Butterflies are vibrant and colorful insects, with colorations designed to deflect predators. A new study from the University of Florida reveals that some of these predator driven defenses may be caused by enemies one-tenth the size of the butterfly. Since Darwin sailed on the Beagle over 150 years ago, scientists have theorized that the main influence on the evolution of coloration in butterflies came from large predators such as...

Smiles Mimic, Show Status
2012-10-15 20:18:49

Enid Burns for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Smile, and the whole world smiles back at you. But if research is any indication, a new study released by students in the department of psychology at the University of California in San Diego shows the action of returning a smile is determined by station and sense of security. A report presented at the annual Society for Neuroscience conference in New Orleans titled by Evan Carr, a graduate student at UC San Diego and one of the...

European Paper Wasp Never Cries Wolf
2012-08-20 07:13:34

European paper wasps (Polistes dominula) advertise the size of their poison glands to potential predators, finds a new study published in BioMed Central's open access journal Frontiers in Zoology. The brighter the color, the larger the poison gland. Aposematism is used by many different animals to warn potential predators that they are poisonous. Usually this takes the form of distinctive coloration or patterns which predators quickly learn to avoid. Paper wasps have conspicuous yellow and...

2012-08-03 01:06:24

New research explains why female cuckoos have evolved different guises To minimize the chance of being recognized and thus attacked by the birds they are trying to parasitize, female cuckoos have evolved different guises. The new research, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, was published today, 03 August, in the journal Science. The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) lays its eggs in the nests of other birds. On hatching, the young cuckoo ejects the host's eggs and chicks...


Latest Mimicry Reference Libraries

39_5331cfef0f677884ac59235c1f903204
2007-02-25 21:04:29

Combtooth blennies are blennioids; perciform marine fish of the family Blenniidae. They are the largest family of blennies, with approximately 371 species in 53 genera represented. Combtooth blennies are found in tropical and subtropical waters in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans; some species are also found in brackish and even freshwater environments. Physical description The body plan of the Combtooth blennies is archetypal to all other blennioids; their blunt heads and eyes...

40_c79a9ae16083a994e518c081bf23855d
2005-09-08 11:25:28

Flower-flies (also known as hover-flies) are a family of flies (Diptera), with the scientific name of "Syrphidae". As their names suggests, they are most often seen around flowers. The adults feed mainly on nectar and pollen, while the larvae (maggots) eat a wide range of foods. In certain species, the larvae are saprophytes, eating decaying plant and animal matter in the soil or in ponds and streams. In others, the larvae are insectivores and prey on aphids, thrips, and other...

40_8ce94a775a333fe9368766757b029404
2005-08-25 10:17:06

The Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is a well-known North American butterfly with easily identifiable orange and black wings. The females have darker veins on their wings, and the males have a spot in the center of each hindwing from which pheromones are released. Monarchs are especially noted for their lengthy annual migration. They make massive southward migrations from August through October. A northward migration takes place in the spring. During these migrations the females...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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