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Latest Mimicry Stories

7c03f88f1c7869518c66f086b0c30ef71
2009-08-31 11:50:00

Travelers to the neotropics"”the tropical lands of the Americas"”might be forgiven for thinking that all of the colorful insects flittering over sunny puddles or among dense forest understory are butterflies. In fact, many are not. Some are moths that have reinvented themselves as butterflies, converging on the daytime niche typically dominated by their less hairy relatives. Now, a new revision of the taxonomic relationships among one such group of insects, the subfamily...

eb28a2e2396ca99f50a5e8ec4170265b1
2009-08-14 10:30:00

Imitation and mimicry have long been an interesting part of human social behavior, but a recent study found that imitation may serve as a way for monkeys to form connections. After examining the behavior of capuchin monkeys, experts found that the monkeys develop closer bonds with humans who mimic their actions than with those who do not. The Capuchin monkey is considered to be one of the most intelligent New World monkeys, using stones often weighing as much as the monkeys to open nuts and...

182dd3642c7e7d9c15e59ecb7879355b1
2009-04-30 14:45:44

Two recently published studies show that some birds, parrots in particular, can "dance" to a musical beat. The reports, published online on April 30th in Current Biology, reveal that birds can also bob their heads, tap their feet, and sway their bodies along to a musical beat. Researchers said the findings show that a very basic aspect of the human response to music is shared with other species. "We've discovered a cockatoo [named Snowball] that dances to the beat of human music," said...

2009-01-08 12:59:46

Insects mistake buildings, cars and even roads for water, laying eggs that will never hatch and jeopardizing ecosystems, a U.S. university researcher said. These ecological traps are caused by polarized light reflecting from windows, asphalt roads -- even plastic sheets and oil spills, Michigan State University research associate Bruce Robertson said. To some species, the light creates an appearance that mimics the surface of the water, which the insects use to breed and feed, he and...

2008-07-29 15:00:49

Ads for teenage products that depict sexual behavior blur the lines between what is acceptable and what is not, a U.S. researcher said. John Chapin, an associate professor of communications at Penn State University, said television shows and advertising have a built in cool factor which invites mimicry, ABC News reported Tuesday. It's promoting a lifestyle and making something more glamorous, Chapin said. Shows like Gossip Girl and ads for American Apparel have pushed sexual themes...

2008-02-21 13:41:25

Circular markings on creatures such as butterflies are effective against predators because they are conspicuous features, not because they mimic the eyes of the predators' own enemies, according to research published today in the journal, Behavioral Ecology[1]. Zoologists based at the University of Cambridge challenge the 150-year-old theory about why these markings are effective against predators. Many animals possess protective markings to avoid predation, including patterns to reduce the...

2006-01-11 13:00:00

LONDON (Reuters) - British researchers said on Wednesday they had uncovered the first proof of teaching in non-human animals -- ants showing each other the way to food. The ants studied over two years by scientists from Bristol University used a technique known as tandem running -- one ant led another ant from the nest to a food source. It was a genuine case of teaching as ant leaders observed by Professor Nigel Franks and Tom Richardson slowed down if the follower got too far behind. If the...


Latest Mimicry Reference Libraries

39_5331cfef0f677884ac59235c1f903204
2007-02-25 21:04:29

Combtooth blennies are blennioids; perciform marine fish of the family Blenniidae. They are the largest family of blennies, with approximately 371 species in 53 genera represented. Combtooth blennies are found in tropical and subtropical waters in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans; some species are also found in brackish and even freshwater environments. Physical description The body plan of the Combtooth blennies is archetypal to all other blennioids; their blunt heads and eyes...

40_c79a9ae16083a994e518c081bf23855d
2005-09-08 11:25:28

Flower-flies (also known as hover-flies) are a family of flies (Diptera), with the scientific name of "Syrphidae". As their names suggests, they are most often seen around flowers. The adults feed mainly on nectar and pollen, while the larvae (maggots) eat a wide range of foods. In certain species, the larvae are saprophytes, eating decaying plant and animal matter in the soil or in ponds and streams. In others, the larvae are insectivores and prey on aphids, thrips, and other...

40_8ce94a775a333fe9368766757b029404
2005-08-25 10:17:06

The Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is a well-known North American butterfly with easily identifiable orange and black wings. The females have darker veins on their wings, and the males have a spot in the center of each hindwing from which pheromones are released. Monarchs are especially noted for their lengthy annual migration. They make massive southward migrations from August through October. A northward migration takes place in the spring. During these migrations the females...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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