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Latest Mineral dust Stories

2008-09-28 03:00:22

By Bellantone, V Carofalo, I; De Tomasi, F; Perrone, M R; Santese, M; Tafuro, A M; Turnone, A ABSTRACT Ground-based particulate matter (PM) samplers, an XeF Raman lidar operating in the framework of the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET), and a sun/sky radiometer operating in the framework of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) have been used to characterize vertical profiles, optical and microphysical properties, and chemical composition of aerosols during the 29 June-1...

2008-09-02 03:00:25

By Docksai, Rick A layer of dust won't complement your bookshelf, but its presence may be a sign of good news about future hurricanes. The 2008 hurricane season was milder due to the increased presence of dust clouds over the Atlantic Ocean, according to Amato Evan, a researcher for the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies. "If those dust storms continue to intensify, that would certainly help to quell this period of intense hurricane...

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2007-03-28 15:55:00

A recent NASA study suggests that tiny dust particles may have foiled forecasts that the 2006 hurricane season would be another active one. In June and July 2006, there were several significant dust storms over the Sahara Desert in Africa. As this dust traveled westward into the Atlantic, satellite data show that the particles blocked sunlight from reaching the ocean surface, causing ocean waters to cool. These cooler waters may have impeded some storminess since hurricanes rely on warm...

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2007-03-06 17:40:00

Determined to understand why some storms grow into hurricanes while others fizzle, NASA scientists recently looked deep into thunderstorms off the African coast using satellites and airplanes. During July and August 2006, a team of international scientists, including NASA researchers, journeyed to the west coast of Africa. Their mission was to better understand why some clusters of thunderstorms that drift off the African coast, known as easterly waves, develop into furious hurricanes, while...

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2007-01-29 09:18:37

When a small pebble drops into a serene pool of water, it causes a ripple in the water in every direction, even disturbing distant still waters. NASA researchers have found a similar process at work in the atmosphere: tiny particles in the air called aerosols can cause a rippling effect on the climate thousands of miles away from their source region. The researchers found that dust particles from the desert regions in northern Africa can produce climate changes as far away as the northern...

2006-08-27 05:20:44

By Nick Tattersall KAWSARA, Senegal (Reuters) - Senegalese villagers watching from under cashew nut trees looked on bemused as U.S. scientists emerged from beneath a rotating radar and launched a small white helium balloon into the air. U.S. weather experts have descended on this tiny village to try to understand how hurricanes that slam into the southeastern United States and the Caribbean are formed in West Africa before they go bowling across the Atlantic. The study, backed by...

2005-07-23 18:16:59

MIAMI (AP) -- An enormous, hazy cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert is blowing toward the southern United States, but meteorologists do not expect much effect beyond colorful sunsets. The leading edge of the cloud - nearly the size of the continental United States - should move across Florida sometime from Monday through Wednesday. "This is not going to be a tremendous event, but it will be kind of interesting," said Jim Lushine, a severe weather expert with the National Weather Service in...

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2005-04-24 09:15:00

When humans return to the Moon and travel to Mars, they'll have to be careful of what they inhale. Science@NASA -- In 1972, Apollo astronaut Harrison Schmidt sniffed the air in his Lunar Module, the Challenger. "[It] smells like gunpowder in here," he said. His commander Gene Cernan agreed. "Oh, it does, doesn't it?" The two astronauts had just returned from a long moonwalk around the Taurus-Littrow valley, near the Sea of Serenity. Dusty footprints marked their entry into the spaceship....


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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