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Latest Mississippi basin Stories

2008-09-02 15:00:13

To: ENVIRONMENTAL EDITORS Contact: Tony Iallonardo of the National Audubon Society, +1-202- 861-2242 x3042 WASHINGTON, Sept. 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Today the Environmental Protection Agency made a rare decision to veto a $220 million Army Corps of Engineers flood-control project in the Mississippi Delta known as Yazoo Pump. Such vetoes of Army Corps projects are rare, having happened only 12 times in the EPA's history and not since 1990. Audubon, other conservation groups and...

2008-07-23 03:00:35

By Ryan Stotts, La Crosse Tribune, Wis. Jul. 23--BROWNSVILLE, Minn. -- The idea is a Mississippi River more like what it was before the locks and dams. That's how Judy Mader of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency sees the creation of new islands in Pool 8 near Brownsville this summer. "The main reason for building the islands is for bird and fisheries habitat," Mader said, "but there is the side benefit of water quality." Water quality has been seriously inhibited, she said, after...

2008-07-09 21:00:15

A freight train derailed into the Mississippi River in Iowa Wednesday when it hit tracks mangled by a boulder freed from a rain-soaked bluff, authorities said. Two crew members of the Iowa Chicago and Eastern train suffered minor injuries in the 3 a.m. accident four miles south of Guttenberg, The (Cedar Rapids) Gazette reported. Four diesel locomotives were reported to have plunged at least partially into the river, state Department of Natural Resources officials said. DNR conservation...

2008-07-08 00:00:13

By MARY RAE BRAGG The Dubuque floodwall's effect in contributing to recent downstream flooding of Mississippi River communities is, you might say, a drop in the bucket. There is no need for Dubuquers to feel guilty about the wall's protection as it channels rising water around the city because there are more than enough other factors contributing to the flooding, according to Jerry Enzler, executive director of the National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium. "(Dubuquers) have...

2008-06-18 03:00:17

OAKVILLE, Iowa - The floodwaters that deluged much of Iowa have done more than knock out drinking water and destroy homes. They have also spread a noxious brew of sewage, farm chemicals and fuel that could sicken anyone who wades in. LeRoy Lippert, the chairman of emergency management and homeland security in nearby Des Moines County, warned people to avoid the floodwaters: "If you drink this water and live, tell me about it. You have no idea. It is very, very wise to stay out of it....

2008-06-17 21:00:11

By Allen G Breed OAKVILLE, Iowa - When the water rose around his family's hog farm, 15-year-old Logan Lanz tried to get their 800 piglets out of harm's way. Instead he found himself wading through floodwater choked with the animals' bodies. "We only got seven of them out," he said on Monday. Most of the farm's 350 sows also were lost Sunday to the floodwaters, now filthy brown with pig waste, diesel fuel, farm chemicals and who knows what else. Officials warned people to stay out of the...

2008-06-17 00:00:16

BURLINGTON, Iowa _ Near the water's edge on Jefferson Street in Burlington, Iowa, Louise Vaughan, a slight woman with strong hands, lugged cartons of bottled water near where volunteers were filling sandbags. As the Mississippi rose toward historic levels, Vaughan was ordered out of her trailer home on Monday, the same home where she rode out the Great Flood of '93. As generators hummed and forklifts beeped, Vaughan offered grim perspective. "This is worse than 1993," she said, hoping her...

2008-06-16 09:00:03

By ALLEN G BREED By Allen G. Breed and Jim Salter The Associated Press IOWA CITY, Iowa A week's work of frantic sandbagging by students, professors and the National Guard couldn't spare this college town from the surging Iowa River, which has swamped more than a dozen campus buildings and forced the evacuation Sunday of hundreds of nearby homes. The swollen river, which bisects this city of about 60,000 residents, was topping out at about 31.5 feet - a foot and a half below...

2008-06-14 00:00:13

By The Associated Press At her Real McCoy Cafe in Lawrenceville, Ill., Nancy Hettich is mighty proud of the joint's Italian beef sandwich and carrot cake. If only she could open the place to serve it. The 64-year-old proprietor and the southeastern Illinois community of 4,600 near the Indiana line grappled for a second day Thursday with a broken water system that left businesses with no usable tap water, forcing them to close. Such inconveniences were popping up through much of...

2006-08-27 00:03:27

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The Mississippi River remained partially closed on Saturday due to vessel accidents, a U.S. Coast Guard official said on Saturday. Three sections of the river had been closed following separate tow-boat accidents in Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana. Two of the sites have been cleared but the section in Louisiana was due to reopen later this afternoon by about 4 p.m. CDT, according to Coast Guard Petty Officer Susan Blake. Officials were still working to clear...