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Latest MIT Stories

False Memories Implanted In Mice
2013-07-26 05:15:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers exploring the phenomenon of false memory have taken a page out of science fiction, successfully demonstrating that fake recollections could be implanted into the brains of mice. The study, which appears in Thursday's edition of the journal Science, might sound like something out of a Philip K. Dick short story or a Leonardo DiCaprio movie, but it has serious real-world implications, especially in the criminal justice...

Mussels Help Create Artificial Tendons
2013-07-24 11:54:52

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online MIT researchers have discovered precisely why mussels are able to stick to slick surfaces so well, even when faced with stiff currents and rocking waves. And beyond unraveling one more of nature's little secrets, the researchers believe they can use this information to help repair human tendons. Mussels use filaments called byssus threads to adhere to piers, rocks and more. These byssus threads allow the mussels to stray out a...

2013-07-23 13:31:35

New technique can rapidly turn genes on and off, helping scientists better understand their function. Although human cells have an estimated 20,000 genes, only a fraction of those are turned on at any given time, depending on the cell’s needs — which can change by the minute or hour. To find out what those genes are doing, researchers need tools that can manipulate their status on similarly short timescales. That is now possible, thanks to a new...

2013-07-17 23:18:02

Cenegenics—the world’s largest age management medicine practice—announced their CFO Rosalind J. Sullivan recently graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s rigorous 20-month, executive-schedule MBA program from MIT's Sloan School of Management, earning her second graduate degree. Las Vegas, NV (PRWEB) July 17, 2013 Rosalind J. Sullivan, Cenegenics’ Chief Financial Officer, graduated from the highly ranked Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan...

Why Do Some Surfaces Repel Water, While Others Attract It?
2013-07-17 05:17:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at MIT are working on better understanding how surfaces attract or repel water. When water strikes a surface, sometimes it spreads evenly while other times it beads into tiny droplets. Studying this behavior can lead to improvements in many applications. If water strikes a material and maximizes its contact with it, then it is known as hydrophilic, but when water is naturally repelled on a material, it is called...

Phytoplankton Ocean Turbulence Social Mixers
2013-07-15 12:58:35

[Watch the video: Phytoplankton Social Mixers] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The motility of phytoplankton allows the tiny ocean plants to determine their fate in ocean turbulence, according to scientists at MIT and Oxford University. Researchers wrote in the journal Nature Communications that the individual vortices that make up ocean turbulence are like social mixers for phytoplankton. This social mixer brings similar cells into close proximity, helping to...

2013-07-13 23:04:28

MIT Scientist Eric Alm partners with the Acera School to teach elementary school students innovation in science with BP funded oil spill experiment. (PRWEB) July 13, 2013 The Acera School in Winchester MA is partnering with MIT professor Eric Alm to free the minds of future innovators and tackle one of the world’s most complex environmental issues— oil spills—at the same time. This past month Alm is led the intermediate elementary school class in an experiment designed to grow...

Bacteria Flagella Utilize Evolutionary Foible
2013-07-09 08:58:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Marine microbes change swimming directions with a sideways flick of their lone flagellum, a type of high-speed controlled failure first documented in 2011 as a unique swimming stroke but whose underlying mechanism had eluded researchers until now. Bacteria swim by rotating the helical, hair-like flagella that extend from their unicellular bodies. Some bacteria, such as the Escherichia coli (E. coli) living in the human gut, have...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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