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Latest Mitosis Stories

2f9d8363e8f6032ee9a1dae04a6cfeb61
2010-02-22 09:05:02

Regulatory proteins common to all eukaryotic cells can have additional, unique functions in embryonic stem (ES) cells, according to a study in the February 22 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. If cancer progenitor cells"”which function similarly to stem cells"”are shown to rely on these regulatory proteins in the same way, it may be possible to target them therapeutically without harming healthy neighboring cells. The new study, by Thomas Fazzio and Barbara Panning (University...

6ff7b3e43df1a751617dd7ecde9f3f1f
2010-02-04 14:46:48

Nuclear pore complexes are best known as the communication channels that regulate the passage of all molecules to and from a cell's nucleus. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, however, have shown that some of the pores' constituent proteins, called nucleoporins, pull double duty as transcription factors regulating the activity of genes active during early development. This is the first time nucleoporins' gene regulatory function has been demonstrated in multicellular...

2010-01-14 12:39:47

Chromosomes move faster than we first thought. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal, Genome Biology, details new findings about the way chromosomes move around the nucleus when leaving the proliferative stage of the cell cycle and entering quiescence "“ and the unexpected speed at which they move. Researchers from Brunel University's Institute for Cancer Genetics and Pharmacogenomics have been trying to understand how human chromosomes occupy different territories...

7d6e2637c0f32dae1b0562f603a8fdfb1
2010-01-11 08:54:41

A ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that regulates the cell cycle promotes chromosome missegregation and tumor formation, according to van Ree et al. in the January 11 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org). The mitotic E2 enzyme UbcH10 partners with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) to ubiquitinate cell cycle regulators, targeting them for proteasomal destruction, and ensuring progression through mitosis. UbcH10 is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, but...

2010-01-05 21:37:13

Each cell inherits genes from its parent as well as epigenetic information "“ what amounts to an instruction manual that specifies which genes should be activated or "expressed," when and to what level. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientist Chris Vakoc, M.D., Ph.D., and his team have now discovered how some of these epigenetic instructions get stably transferred from one generation of cells to the next. The scientists report that newly formed cells inherit the knowledge of...

2009-10-06 15:10:30

When it comes to the two basic types of cells, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, compartmentalization is everything. Prokaryotes are evolutionarily ancient cells that only have a membrane surrounding their outer boundary, while the more complex eukaryotes have an outer membrane and membrane bound compartments within the cell. Perhaps most notable is the double layered membrane that surrounds the nucleus, the cellular compartment which houses the cell's genetic material. The genetic material is very...

2009-10-05 14:20:46

A Purdue University researcher has discovered that the absence of certain proteins needed for proper cell duplication can lead to cancer. Xiaoqi Liu, an assistant professor of biochemistry, found that cytoplasmic linker protein-170, or CLIP-170, plays a major role in proper cell duplication and DNA distribution. When the protein is removed, cell duplicates lack entire copies of DNA and can become cancerous. Liu's findings were published in the early online version of the Journal of Biological...

2009-09-14 15:41:39

New insights gained into how polyploidy and genomic change can lead to evolutionary change and plants' fitness and vigor An individual with Down syndrome and a male calico cat have one thing in common"”each has an extra chromosome. For animals, most instances of an extra chromosome result in birth defects or even death, but plants are another matter entirely. Many plants are able to survive the presence of an extra copy of their entire genome (known as polyploidy) and are often even...

be41750fabd1c7c5e38f9a4a2b6e51911
2009-08-24 08:21:19

Mitotic release of chromatin-binding RNA gives insight into X chromosome silencing Early in development, mammalian female cells counteract their double dose of X chromosomes by coating one of them with a large RNA named XIST. The RNA binds to the same X chromosome from which it is transcribed and initiates a series of events leading to the chromosome's permanent silencing. In the August 24, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology, Hall et al. exploit the fact that XIST temporarily...

d42062ea4ed48874a76c016665932faa1
2009-08-17 16:25:00

"A biologist, a physicist, and a nanotechnologist walk into a ..." sounds like the start of a joke. Instead, it was the start of a collaboration that has helped to decipher a critical, but so far largely unstudied, phase of how cells divide. Errors in cell division can cause mutations that lead to cancer, and this study could shed light on the role of chromosome abnormalities in uncontrolled cell replication.The biologist in question is University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Associate...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.