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Latest Mitosis Stories

2009-06-07 12:30:00

In a new study, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists disprove a century-old theory about why cancer cells often have too many or too few chromosomes, and show that the actual reason may hold the key to a novel approach to cancer therapy. Since the late 19th century, scientists have attributed the surplus or shortage of intact chromosomes in cancer cells to a kind of fragmentation in cell division: instead of dividing neatly into two identical daughter cells, as normal cells do, cancer...

2009-05-31 09:18:23

By using ultrafast laser pulses to slice off pieces of chromosomes and observe how the chromosomes behave, biomedical engineers at the University of Michigan have gained pivotal insights into mitosis, the process of cell division. Their findings could help scientists better understand genetic diseases, aging and cancer. Cells in plants, fungi, and animals"”including those in the human body"”divide through mitosis, during which the DNA-containing chromosomes separate between the...

2009-05-27 09:07:00

-Knowledge May Improve Diagnosis for Children with Cornelia deLange Syndrome- PHILADELPHIA, May 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An international team of scientists studying a rare genetic disease discovered that a bundle of proteins with the long-established function of keeping chromosomes together also plays an important role in regulating genes in humans. When gene regulation is disrupted in the multisystem genetic disease Cornelia deLange syndrome (CdLS), children may suffer missing...

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2009-02-09 07:23:24

The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong, diseases such as cancer can arise. Scientists have tried for years to...

2009-02-06 10:03:50

Team finds that Orc1, part of machinery that initiates DNA replication, prevents excess centrosome duplication Before a cell can divide into two, first it must duplicate its genetic material--the DNA packed in its chromosomes. The two new sets of chromosomes then have to be separated from one another and correctly distributed to the resulting "daughter" cells, so that both daughter cells are genetically identical to the original, or "parent," cell. During cell division, a cellular organ...

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2009-01-26 14:12:10

Study uncovers long-sought mechanism that limits centriole duplication, with implications for potential cancer treatments Like DNA, centrioles need to duplicate only once per cell cycle. Rogers et al. uncover a long-sought mechanism that limits centriole copying, showing that it depends on the timely demolition of a protein that spurs the organelles' replication. The study will appear in the January 26, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. Centrioles start reproducing themselves during...

2009-01-16 13:42:30

Dartmouth Medical School researchers have found two proteins that work in concert to ensure proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Their study is in the January 2009 issue of the journal Nature Cell Biology.This finding is relevant for treating solid cancerous tumors that lose the ability to accurately segregate their chromosomes. Tumors that shuffle chromosomes, a process called chromosomal instability, are known to have a poor prognosis."We show that the function of two...

2009-01-12 12:11:13

In the 13th January print edition of the journal Current Biology, Instituto Gubenkian de Ciencia researchers provide insight into an old mystery in cell biology, and offer up new clues to understanding cancer. Inês Cunha Ferreira and M³nica Bettencourt Dias, working with researchers at the universities of Cambridge, UK, and Siena, Italy, unravelled the mystery of how cells count the number of centrosomes, the structure that regulates the cell's skeleton, controls the...

2008-12-25 21:32:47

U.S. researchers have discovered a cellular process that explains how cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli work to prevent breast cancer. Breast cancer can be protected against by eating cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage and near relatives of cabbage such as broccoli and cauliflower, first author Olga Azarenko of the University of California in Santa Barbara said in a statement. These vegetables contain compounds called isothiocyanates which we believe to be responsible for the...

2008-12-23 15:05:00

- GlaxoSmithKline continues to lead development activities for GSK-923295 LONDON, Dec. 23 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Cytokinetics, Incorporated (Nasdaq: CYTK) announced today that GSK has informed Cytokinetics that it will not exercise its option to license ispinesib or SB-743921 as provided under the Collaboration and License Agreement entered into by the companies in 2001. All rights to ispinesib and SB-743921, each novel inhibitors of kinesin spindle protein...