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Latest Model organisms Stories

Genes Associated With Genomic Expansions That Cause Disease Identified
2012-09-10 11:49:17

Examining trinucleotide repeats A study of more than 6,000 genes in a common species of yeast has identified the pathways that govern the instability of GAA/TTC repeats. In humans, the expansions of these repeats is known to inactivate a gene — FXN — which leads to Friedreich's ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease that is currently incurable. In yeast, long repeats also destabilize the genome, manifested by the breakage of chromosomes. Working with collaborators at Tufts...

2012-08-03 01:19:53

Planarian flatworms have come under intense study for their renowned ability to regenerate any missing body part, even as adults. But now they may take on a starring role as a model system for studying eye development and eye diseases in vertebrates, including humans. This expansion of the planarian job description comes courtesy of Whitehead Institute researchers, who this week are publishing in Cell Reports an exhaustive catalog of genes active in the planarian eye. "It's exciting to...

2012-05-07 20:23:40

Candidate gene controls IGF1 levels, affecting both onset of reproductive maturity and longevity An intriguing clue to longevity lurks in the sexual maturation timetable of female mammals, Jackson Laboratory researchers and their collaborators report. Jackson researchers including Research Scientist Rong Yuan, Ph.D., had previously established that mouse strains with lower circulating levels of the hormone IGF1 at age six months live longer than other strains. In research published May...

Rats Have Best Bite Of Rodent World
2012-04-30 07:36:42

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that mice and rats have evolved to gnaw with their front teeth and chew with their back teeth more successfully than rodents that 'specialize' in one or other of these biting mechanisms. Researchers designed a computer model to simulate the bite of rats to understand whether their skull shape or muscle arrangement was a major factor in their evolutionary success and global dominance, making them one of the most common pest species in the...

2012-04-09 13:25:33

Rice University study links touch-activated genes to both growth and insect defense A new study by Rice University scientists reveals that plants can use the sense of touch to fight off fungal infections and insects. The study, which will be published in the April 24 issue of Current Biology, finds that plant defenses are enhanced when plants are touched. “From previous studies, we knew that plants change their growth in response to touch but we didn´t know how these growth...

2012-04-05 21:08:21

TAU breeds population of lab mice with genetic diversity closer to humans With a 95 percent genomic similarity to humans, mice have long been used to learn about the genetic causes of human disease. Once researchers can shine a light on the genetic factors that cause disease in mice, they can start to develop prevention and treatment options to protect the human population. But this process, called genetic mapping, is a long and difficult road, made more challenging by the 5% difference...


Latest Model organisms Reference Libraries

African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis
2014-08-18 16:16:15

The African clawed frog is found in its natural habitat throughout Africa. However, it has been introduced in North America, South America and Europe. This species is fully aquatic and is found abundantly in ponds, lakes, and rivers. The body color of the African clawed frog is a greenish grey and the skin is smooth and slippery with blotches of grey or brown on the back. The belly is a cream colored with a yellow tint. The average length of this species is five inches. The body and head...

Auckland Island Pig
2014-08-07 11:44:58

The Auckland Island pig is a breed of feral pig that resides on Auckland Island in New Zealand. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, domestic pigs were released onto many sub-Antarctic islands, including Auckland Island, by Europeans who wanted stranded sailors or whalers to have a steady supply of food when visiting these uninhabited islands. This process began in 1807 and after several other releases occurring between 1840 and the 1890’s, the pigs began to establish a healthy...

House Mouse, Mus musculus
2012-05-01 11:42:07

Even in the wild, this rodent is associated with humans by destroying crops and stored food. The house mouse is also known as the fancy mouse, a common pet. It is also a widely used laboratory animal, important for testing in genetics, biology, and medicine. There are three recognized subspecies of the house mouse. These mice thrive in a number of locations including fields, houses, and commercial structures. An adult male house mouse can have a body length of up to 3.9 in, and tail length...

42_ab721bccab54c7f7ca8dd61e19cacdd4
2007-08-10 16:14:02

The Common House Mouse (Mus musculus), is the most numerous species of the genus Mus. It is the most common and populous mammalian species on earth, besides humans. House mice almost always live in close proximity to humans. Laboratory mice belong to strains of house mice and are some of the most important model organisms in biology and medicine. They are by far the most commonly used laboratory mammal. House mice are light brown to black, with short hair and a light belly. The ears and...

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Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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