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Latest Models of migration to the New World Stories

Oregon Artifacts Stir Up Debate On Earliest Americans
2012-07-15 05:36:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Artifacts found in Oregon have once again stirred up the debate surrounding the earliest Americans and how they came to live in the Western Hemisphere. A team of mostly American researchers led by Dennis L. Jenkins, a University of Oregon archeologist, recently described the finding of several small spearheads and hunting tools along with human feces in the Paisley Cave complex that dated back to around 13,000 years ago. Their report...

2012-07-11 13:34:05

Scientists have found that Native American populations – from Canada to the southern tip of Chile – arose from at least three migrations, with the majority descended entirely from a single group of First American migrants that crossed over through Beringia, a land bridge between Asia and America that existed during the ice ages, more than 15,000 years ago. By studying variations in Native American DNA sequences, the international team found that while most of the Native...

Deglaciation Data Opens Door For Earlier First Americans Migration
2012-06-25 04:06:21

A new study of lake sediment cores from Sanak Island in the western Gulf of Alaska suggests that deglaciation there from the last Ice Age took place as much as 1,500 to 2,000 years earlier than previously thought, opening the door for earlier coastal migration models for the Americas. The Sanak Island Biocomplexity Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, also concluded that the maximum thickness of the ice sheet in the Sanak Island region during the last glacial maximum was 70...

2011-09-19 22:04:39

Researchers at Brown University and Stanford University have pieced together ancient human migration in North and South America. Writing in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, the authors find that technology spread more slowly in the Americas than in Eurasia. Population groups in the Americas have less frequent exchanges than groups that fanned out over  Europe and Asia. How modern-day humans dispersed on the planet and the pace of civilization-changing technologies that...

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2011-03-25 06:10:00

Scientists have uncovered ancient stone tools and thousands of other artifacts dating back 15,500 years at an archaeological dig in Texas, suggesting that humans settled the continent 2,500 years earlier than previously believed. The site, located in the Buttermilk Creek complex near Austin, is now the oldest settlement ever found in North America, scientists reported Thursday. The findings could challenge conventional beliefs about who the first American inhabitants were, and when they...

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2011-03-05 11:12:13

Oregon, Smithsonian-led team uncovers numerous artifacts at late Pleistocene sites on the Channel IslandsEvidence for a diversified sea-based economy among North American inhabitants dating from 12,200 to 11,400 years ago is emerging from three sites on California's Channel Islands.Reporting in the March 4 issue of Science, a 15-member team led by University of Oregon and Smithsonian Institution scholars describes the discovery of scores of stemmed projectile points and crescents dating to...

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2010-07-24 06:07:02

Researchers say that a scientific reconstruction of one of the oldest sets of human remains found in the Americas supports theories that the first people who came to the hemisphere migrated from a broader area than once thought. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History released photos on Thursday of the reconstructed image of a woman who probably lived on Mexico's Caribbean coast 10,000 to 12,000 years ago.  Anthropologist have believed for a while that humans migrated...

2010-06-30 12:30:33

The initial peopling of North America from Asia occurred approximately 15,000-18,000 years ago, however estimations of the genetic diversity of the first settlers have remained inaccurate. In a report published June 29 in Genome Research, researchers have found that the diversity of the first Americans has been significantly underestimated, underscoring the importance of comprehensive sampling for accurate analysis of human migrations. Substantial evidence suggests that humans first crossed...

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2008-05-09 09:45:00

Earliest known human settlement in the Americas raises new questionsNew evidence, more questions. That's the thumbnail of the first new data reported in 10 years from Monte Verde, the earliest known human settlement in the Americas.Evidence from the archaeological site in southern Chile confirms Monte Verde is the Americas earliest known settlement and is consistent with the idea that early human migration occurred along the Pacific Coast more than 14,000 years ago, but questions remain about...

2008-04-08 00:00:08

By Sandi Doughton SEATTLE - Hold the potty humor, please, but archaeologists digging in a dusty cave in Oregon have unearthed fossilized feces that appear to be the oldest biological evidence of humans in North America. The ancient poop dates back 14,300 years. If the results hold up, that means the continent was populated more than 1,000 years before the so-called Clovis culture, long believed to be the first Americans. "This adds to a growing body of evidence that the human presence...