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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 21:24 EDT
Exotic Materials Study Could Lead To Advanced Electronic

Exotic Materials Study Could Lead To Advanced Electronic Devices

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In an attempt to help scale down the size of electronic devices to atomic dimensions, researchers from Cornell University and the Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated how to...

Latest Molecular beam epitaxy Stories

Image 1 - Down To The Wire
2011-09-01 09:40:25

  Berkeley Lab researchers develop inexpensive technique for making high quality nanowire solar cells Solar or photovoltaic cells represent one of the best possible technologies for providing an absolutely clean and virtually inexhaustible source of energy to power our civilization. However, for this dream to be realized, solar cells need to be made from inexpensive elements using low-cost, less energy-intensive processing chemistry, and they need to efficiently and...

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2010-08-02 07:44:10

NIST researchers grow nanowires made of semiconductors"”gallium nitride alloys"”by depositing atoms layer-by-layer on a silicon crystal under high vacuum. NIST has the unusual capability to produce these nanowires without using metal catalysts, thereby enhancing luminescence and reducing defects. NIST nanowires also have excellent mechanical quality factors. The latest experiments, described in Advanced Functional Materials,* maintained the purity and defect-free crystal structure...

2010-04-29 12:54:43

With its new molecular beam epitaxy facility, PTB continues to be the only metrology institute to produce primary quantum Hall effect resistance standards For a long time, the electrical units are feeling at home in the quantum world. In the endeavor to trace the entire International System of Units (SI) back to natural constants, they have long been in the lead - because, among other things, the resistance can be realized with the aid of the quantum Hall effect. The Physikalisch-Technische...

2008-03-28 11:46:43

A collaboration between the Universities of Leeds and Harvard has turned the heat up on terahertz technology, bringing a handheld terahertz device a step closer to reality. The Leeds team, led by Professors Edmund Linfield and Giles Davies from the Faculty of Engineering, has recorded the highest operating temperature for a terahertz quantum cascade laser "“ a technology that scientists believe may unlock the potential of the terahertz frequency range. Professor Linfield explains: "The...