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Latest Molecular genetics Stories

2013-11-19 16:49:06

As the Do-It-Yourself Biology (DIYbio) community has grown, so have concerns among media and policymakers about these science enthusiasts’ ability to wield DNA and manipulate life. In 2009, for example, a Wall Street Journal headline summed up the popular misconception: “In Attics and Closets, ‘Biohackers’ Discover their Inner Frankenstein.” But in a first-ever survey of DIYbio practitioners (DIYers), the Synthetic Biology Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for...

2013-11-14 12:16:16

University of Adelaide researchers have taken a step forward in unraveling the causes of a commonly inherited intellectual disability, finding that a genetic mutation leads to a reduction in certain proteins in the brain. ARX is among the top four types of intellectual disability linked to the X-chromosome in males. So far, 115 families, including many large Australian families, have been discovered to carry an ARX (Aristaless related homeobox) mutation that gives rise to intellectual...

2013-10-23 11:27:14

Genome-wide changes result from silencing extra chromosome, scientists report at ASHG 2013 The first evidence that the underlying genetic defect responsible for trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, can be suppressed in laboratory cultures of patient-derived stem cells was presented today (Oct. 22) at the American Society of Human Genetics 2013 annual meeting in Boston. People with Down syndrome are born with an extra chromosome 21, which results in a variety of physical and...

Plug And Play Synthetic Biology - Rewriting An Entire Genome
2013-10-19 04:15:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of scientists from Harvard and Yale have recorded the entire genome of the bacteria E. coli, and in a dramatic demonstration of the potential of rewriting an organism's genetic code, they have improved the bacterium's ability to resist viruses. "This is the first time the genetic code has been fundamentally changed," according to Farren Isaacs, assistant professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at Yale....

2013-10-08 13:23:15

Nature Study Shows Distinct Behavior of Proteins Reflects Common Biochemical Principles Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found unexpected similarities between proteins that were thought to be fundamentally different. The team studied how proteins bind to RNA, a process required for gene expression. It is known that some proteins only bind RNAs with certain sequences. Other proteins have been deemed “non-specific” because they interact with...

2013-10-07 11:36:12

Understanding how genes act in specific tissues is critical to our ability to combat many human diseases, from heart disease to kidney failure to cancer.  Yet isolating individual cell types for study is impossible for most human tissues. A new method developed by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Michigan called “in silico nano-dissection” uses computers rather than scalpels to separate and identify genes from specific cell types, enabling the systematic study...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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