Quantcast

Latest Molecule Stories

2010-02-11 16:11:48

Physicists at JILA have for the first time observed chemical reactions near absolute zero, demonstrating that chemistry is possible at ultralow temperatures and that reaction rates can be controlled using quantum mechanics, the peculiar rules of submicroscopic physics. The new results and techniques, described in the Feb. 12 issue of Science,* will help scientists understand previously unknown aspects of how molecules interact, a key to advancing biology, creating new materials, producing...

3ec45ffc1a44789812259284779dd6461
2010-01-05 15:00:41

With the passage of a molecule through the labyrinth of a chemical system being so critical to catalysis and other important chemical processes, computer simulations are frequently used to model potential molecule/labyrinth interactions. In the past, such simulations have been expensive and time-consuming to carry out, but now researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a new algorithm that should make future simulations easier and faster to...

2009-12-04 17:36:59

The new method may revolutionize synthesis of natural products and therapeutic drugs A team at The Scripps Research Institute has made major strides in solving a problem that has been plaguing chemists for many years: how best to break carbon-hydrogen bonds and then to create new bonds to join molecules together. This problem is of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry, which currently relies on a method to accomplish this feat that is relatively inefficient and sometimes difficult to...

2009-11-06 13:20:32

Good news for heterogeneous catalysis and the hydrogen economy: computers can now be used to make accurate predictions of the reactions of (hydrogen) molecules with surfaces. An international team of researchers, headed by Leiden theoretical chemist Geert-Jan Kroes, published on this subject this week in the journal Science. Hydrogen on copper The team developed a new method of modeling what happens when hydrogen molecules separate on a copper surface. The way is now open for calculating the...

a71631a41c2d1b586fa7c374f28af37e
2009-10-13 08:58:37

Recently, at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, N.J. Tao and collaborators have found a way to make a key electrical component on a phenomenally tiny scale. Their single-molecule diode is described in this week's online edition of Nature Chemistry. In the electronics world, diodes are a versatile and ubiquitous component. Appearing in many shapes and sizes, they are used in an endless array of devices and are essential ingredients for the semiconductor industry. Making components...

2009-10-09 10:09:09

University of Florida chemists have pioneered a method to tease out promising molecular structures for capturing energy, a step that could speed the development of more efficient, cheaper solar cells. "This gives us a new way of studying light-matter interactions," said Valeria Kleiman, a UF associate professor of chemistry. "It enables us to study not just how the molecule reacts, but actually to change how it reacts, so we can test different energy transfer pathways and find the most...

b6e4fa2a2b5cb6b514bf7965b6cb33911
2009-09-14 12:50:46

Physicists get a grip on slippery molecules, and learn how the shape of nanoscopic magnetic islands affect data storage Molecules of hydrogen are difficult to steer with electric fields because of the symmetrical way that charges are distributed within them. But now researchers at ETH Zurich have found a clever technique to get a grip on the molecules. Their findings are reported in Physical Review Letters and highlighted in the September 14 issue of Physics. Electric fields can easily...

2009-08-27 23:16:00

ZURICH, Aug. 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists have been able to image the "anatomy" -- or chemical structure -- inside a molecule with unprecedented resolution, using a complex technique known as noncontact atomic force microscopy. View video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnLRl_74BZs (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090416/IBMLOGO) The results push the exploration of using molecules and atoms at the smallest scale and could greatly impact the...

2009-08-13 15:24:53

Research at the University of Liverpool has found how mirror-image molecules gain control over each other and dictate the physical state of superstructures.The research team studied "Ëœchiral' or "Ëœdifferent-handed' molecules which are distinguishable by their inability to be superimposed onto their mirror image. Such molecules are common "“ proteins use just one mirror form of amino acids and DNA, one form of sugars. Chirality leads to profound differences in the...

2009-08-13 12:55:00

Research at the University of Liverpool has found how mirror-image molecules gain control over each other and dictate the physical state of superstructures.The research team studied 'chiral' or 'different-handed' molecules which are distinguishable by their inability to be superimposed onto their mirror image. Such molecules are common "“ proteins use just one mirror form of amino acids and DNA, one form of sugars. Chirality leads to profound differences in the way a molecule functions...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
Related