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Latest Monash University Stories

graphene for health applications
2014-08-06 03:30:44

Monash University A chance discovery about the 'wonder material' graphene – already exciting scientists because of its potential uses in electronics, energy storage and energy generation – takes it a step closer to being used in medicine and human health. Researchers from Monash University have discovered that graphene oxide sheets can change structure to become liquid crystal droplets spontaneously and without any specialist equipment. With graphene droplets now easy to produce,...

2014-07-17 16:18:03

Monash University State-of-the-art military hardware could soon fight malaria, one of the most deadly diseases on the planet. Researchers at Monash University and the University of Melbourne have used an anti-tank Javelin missile detector, more commonly used in warfare to detect the enemy, in a new test to rapidly identify malaria parasites in blood. Scientists say the novel idea, published in the journal Analyst, could set a new gold standard for malaria testing. The technique is...

2014-06-24 10:58:46

Monash University Huge advancements have taken place in HIV treatment and prevention over the past 10 years, but there is still no cure or vaccine. The findings are part of a review into the global HIV epidemic published in The Lancet, co-authored by Monash University Professor Sharon Lewin. The review shows that because of advancements in treatment, people with the virus are living longer. Overall, new infections have decreased from 3.3 million in 2002 to 2.3 million in 2012....

2014-06-23 09:37:29

Monash University An international team of scientists led by Monash University researchers has shown how free radicals contribute to type 2 diabetes, obesity and fatty liver disease. Type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are key complications of obesity as 80 per cent of patients with type 2 diabetes are obese, and 75 per cent of patients who are obese or have type 2 diabetes also have fatty liver disease. The team, led by Professor Tony Tiganis from the Department...

2014-06-17 13:28:53

Monash University A tax on sweetened soft drinks could be an effective weapon in the war against obesity, generating weight losses of up to 3.64 kilograms as individuals reduce their consumption. Researchers from Monash University, Imperial College London and University of York and Lancaster University, England have estimated the extent to which drinking habits would change if beverages such as carbonated non-diet soft drinks; cordials and fruit drinks were taxed. Lead author Dr...

2014-04-25 09:44:40

Fibroblasts, cells long thought to be boring and irrelevant, could offer an alternative to heart transplants for patients with heart disease. Researcher Dr Milena Furtado, and her team from the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI) at Monash University, found the heart cell fibroblast is a close relative to a cardiomyocyte, the cell responsible for a healthy beating heart. In research published today in Circulation Research, Dr Furtado has found that cardiac fibroblasts are...

2014-04-08 09:58:09

Gastric banding can play a vital role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in people who are overweight and not obese, according to new research. The Monash University study, led by Emeritus Professor Paul O’Brien from Monash University’s Centre for Obesity Research and Education (CORE) and Dr John Wentworth from CORE and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, has determined that weight loss surgery (gastric banding) for overweight people with diabetes had a profound impact on the...

2014-04-03 13:10:38

An international team of scientists has identified the precise biochemical key that wakes up the body’s immune cells and sends them into action against invading bacteria and fungi. The patented work, published in Nature today, provides the starting point to understanding our first line of defence, and what happens when it goes wrong. It will lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcers and even TB. It could also lead to new protective vaccines....

2013-12-03 13:51:45

Flower color in some parts of the world, including the Himalayas, has evolved to attract bees as pollinators, research has shown for the first time. In a study published in the Journal of Ecology, biologists from Monash University and RMIT University have investigated the evolution of flower colors due to the bee’s color vision. They researched in the understudied Nepalese steep mountainous terrain, and other subtropical environments. The study also has implications for understanding the...

2013-10-09 10:51:35

In a breakthrough for understanding brain evolution, neuroscientists have shown that differences between primate brains - from the tiny marmoset to human – can be largely explained as consequences of the same genetic program. In research published in the Journal of Neuroscience, Professor Marcello Rosa and his team at Monash University's School of Biomedical Sciences and colleagues at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil, used computer modelling to demonstrate that the...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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