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Latest Monell Chemical Senses Center Stories

Excessive Body Odor May Be Caused By Genetic Disorder
2011-09-15 08:40:57

  Researchers from Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia are reporting that people with unexplained body odor issues may be suffering from a metabolic disorder, trimethylaminuria (TMAU) or “fish-odor syndrome”. TMAU is a genetically-transmitted disease that inhibits the ability of an enzyme to metabolize or transform trimethylamine (TMA) and is not based on lack of hygiene or personal care. Instead, the condition becomes apparent when sufferers digest foods rich...

2011-08-31 20:14:41

Scientists from the Monell Center report that approximately one third of patients with unexplained body malodor production test positive for the metabolic disorder trimethylaminuria (TMAU). A definitive diagnosis offers relief to these individuals, as symptoms of TMAU can hinder social and workplace interactions and cause psychological distress. But once the disease is identified, these debilitating symptoms can be ameliorated using changes in diet and other approaches. "Health care...

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2011-08-10 10:10:00

When are our adult food preferences formed? According to new research they are ingrained in us very early in the womb. New research by the Monell Chemical Senses Center finds that mothers can influence a baby's palate and food memories before it is born by introducing foods to her unborn child. In the womb, the baby is surrounded and nourished on the amniotic fluid, which is filled with the flavors of what the mom has eaten. "Things like vanilla, carrot, garlic, anise, mint -- these are some...

2011-08-03 12:18:39

Protein inside taste cells turn off bitter taste New findings may lend insight into why some people are especially sensitive to bitter tastes. Scientists from the Monell Center and Givaudan Flavors have identified a protein inside of taste cells that acts to shorten bitter taste signals. They further report that mice lacking the gene for this taste terminator protein are more sensitive to bitter taste and also find it more aversive, possibly because they experience the taste for a longer...

2011-07-26 21:10:15

Penn researchers have helped develop a nanotech device that combines carbon nanotubes with olfactory receptor proteins, the cell components in the nose that detect odors. Because olfactory receptors belong to a larger class of proteins that are involved in passing signals through the cell membrane, these devices could have applications beyond odor sensing, such as pharmaceutical research.  The research was led by professor A. T. Charlie Johnson, postdoctoral fellow Brett R. Goldsmith...

2011-04-07 12:53:16

NIH-funded scientists report findings on olfactory clues to Alzheimer's disease, the sweet taste of anticipation, and the impact of autoimmune diseases on taste during research meeting in St. Pete Beach, Fla. What: Scientists supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), one of the National Institutes of Health, will be presenting their latest research findings at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS)....

2011-04-06 21:51:13

Success opens doors extending from health to new taste molecules Following years of futile attempts, new research from the Monell Center demonstrates that living human taste cells can be maintained in culture for at least seven months. The findings provide scientists with a valuable tool to learn about the human sense of taste and how it functions in health and disease. This advance ultimately will assist efforts to prevent and treat taste loss or impairment due to infection, radiation,...

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2011-03-08 11:37:06

Multiple taste cell sensors contribute to detecting sugars A new research study dramatically increases knowledge of how taste cells detect sugars, a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption. Scientists from the Monell Center and collaborators have discovered that taste cells have several additional sugar detectors other than the previously known sweet receptor. "Detecting the sweetness of nutritive sugars is one of the most important tasks of our taste cells," said senior...

2011-01-19 13:20:39

Combination of sensory and molecular approaches identify receptor sensitive to anti-inflammatory compounds Scientists from the Monell Center and collaborators report that a receptor known as TRPA1 is activated by two structurally unrelated anti-inflammatory compounds. The first, oleocanthal, is a natural polyphenolic anti-inflammatory agent uniquely found in extra virgin olive oil; while the second, ibuprofen, is an over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The...

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2010-08-25 11:01:28

Blood hounds, cadaver dogs, and other canines who serve humanity may soon have a new partner "• disease detector dogs "• thanks to an unusual experiment in which scientists trained mice to identify feces of ducks infected with bird influenza. Migrating ducks, geese, and other birds can carry and spread flu viruses over wide geographic areas, where the viruses may possibly spread to other species. Reported August 24th at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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