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Latest Mongooses Stories

2014-07-30 08:36:04

WILMINGTON, Ohio, July 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- When the Brevard Zoo in Melbourne, Florida, opened its new "Meerkat Hamlet" earlier this year, installing a boardwalk made of durable, low-maintenance TimberTech® decking was a key component in handling the expected increase of visitors. It also allowed zoo guests an up close and personal view of the fast-moving meerkat action. "The meerkats, with their adorable antics, have attracted 150,000 zoo guests through the Meerkat Hamlet...

Stress Can Cause Mongooses Not To Help Out In The Future
2014-07-25 03:38:38

University of Exeter Researchers studying banded mongooses in Uganda have discovered that those who work hard to care for pups may be less likely to invest in future offspring in the same way due to elevated stress hormones. Dr Jennifer Sanderson, from the University of Exeter, has been observing wild banded mongooses to understand why working hard makes them less likely to work hard in the future. She discovered that when a banded mongoose invests heavily to care for mongoose pups,...

Study Shows Meerkats' Darker Side Is Secret To Their Success
2014-07-24 03:48:59

University of Edinburgh The darker side of meerkats – which sees them prevent their daughters from breeding, and kill their grandchildren – is explained in a new study. Research into the desert creatures – which live in groups with a dominant breeding pair and many adult helpers – shows that the alpha female can flourish when it maintains the sole right to breed. The study shows how this way of life, also found in many animals such as ants and bees, can prove effective...

2014-03-13 12:32:06

WILMINGTON, Ohio, March 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The Brevard Zoo in Melbourne, Florida, celebrates its 20th birthday on March 15, 2014 and part of the festivities will include the grand opening of the "Meerkat Hamlet," a new exhibit in the Exhibition Africa section that houses a multi-generational family of meerkats. Installing a boardwalk made of durable, low maintenance TimberTech® decking was a key component in bringing zoo guests closer to the spunky meerkat action. The new...

2014-02-10 11:05:48

When people see a skunk, the reaction usually is “Eww,” but when they see a group of meerkats peering around, they often think “Aww.” Why some animals use noxious scents while others live in social groups to defend themselves against predators is the question that biologists Tim Caro of the University of California, Davis and Theodore Stankowich of California State University, Long Beach  and sought to answer through a comprehensive analysis of predator-prey interactions among...

Mongooses Synchronize Births To Escape Infanticide
2013-12-24 07:28:41

University of Exeter Some mammals may have evolved to synchronize births as a way of evading the threat of infanticide, according to a study led by the University of Exeter. To ensure groups remain productive, some social animals 'police' selfish reproduction by subordinate animals by killing any offspring they produce. For example, in honeybees and other social insects some workers lay their own eggs, but these are identified and killed by the rest of the workforce. The new study...

2013-10-10 23:25:52

Zookeepers are thrilled with the new additions as this is the third litter of pups within the last year. Oakland, CA (PRWEB) October 10, 2013 Oakland Zoo’s meerkat mob has expanded by two. Now on exhibit in African Village, guests have the opportunity to see the siblings. The pair, born in early September, has recently been spotted outside of their night house and exhibit tunnels. Zookeepers are thrilled with the new additions as this is the third litter of pups within the last year....

2013-10-08 09:46:13

Subordinate female meerkats who try to breed often lose their offspring to infanticide by the dominant female or are evicted from the group. These recently bereaved or ostracized mothers may then become wet-nurses for the dominant female, an activity that may be a form of "rent" that allows them to remain in the community. Wet-nursing another mother's offspring – called allolactation – occurs across a variety of mammals and is thought to provide survival benefits to the nursed...

African Mongoose Carries Disease Deadly To Humans
2013-05-15 12:31:44

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from Virginia Tech has identified the banded mongoose as one of the biggest public health threats in Africa. According to their report in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, the mongoose carries a deadly disease called leptospirosis that spreads easily to humans. Often misdiagnosed as malaria, leptospirosis usually begins with a fever and can progress into liver failure, meningitis and...

Meerkat Study Helps To Understand How Animals Cope With Novel Man-made Threats
2013-02-19 09:56:00

ETH Zurich In their environment, wild animals are exposed to countless threats, be they predators, diseases or natural obstacles to get over, such as gorges or rivers. In the course of evolution, they have developed specific behavioral responses to allow them to deal with these risks. In recent times, numerous man-made threats have been added to the naturally-existing ones, such as dangerous roads to cross. On the evolutionary time scale, it is excluded that the animals have evolved a...


Latest Mongooses Reference Libraries

Crab-eating Mongoose, Herpestes urva
2012-11-16 13:32:25

The crab-eating mongoose (Herpestes urva) is a mammal that can be found in east and Southeast Asia. Its range includes southern China, Nepal, Myanmar, and northeastern India, as well as areas Laos, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Vietnam in Southeast Asia. This species is active mainly at night, spending a good percentage of their time in water or near water and other moist areas. It is slender in appearance, with a short tail and hairy feet. Its fur is typically grey on the upper side and lighter on...

Ruddy Mongoose, Herpestes smithii
2012-11-07 14:31:45

The ruddy mongoose (Herpestes smithii) is native to Sri Lanka and India. It prefers a habitat within forested areas, but can sometimes be found in open fields. It holds two subspecies throughout its range, with one occurring in Sri Lanka and the other occurring in India. This species resembles the Indian gray mongoose, although it is larger and has a longer, black tipped tail. As is similar to mongoose species, it hunts during the daytime and nighttime. In Sri Lanka, this mongoose is called...

Indian Gray Mongoose, Herpestes edwardsii
2012-11-05 15:33:13

The Indian gray mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii), also known as the common gray mongoose, occurs in many areas of southern Asia, although it does appear in other areas of Asia. Its range includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. It prefers a habitat within open forested areas, and scrublands, but can also be found in human populated areas like cultivated fields. This species is often kept as pets and can be found on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern.”...

Common Dwarf Mongoose, Helogale parvula
2012-11-05 15:29:32

The common dwarf mongoose (Helogale parvula), also known simply as the dwarf mongoose, is native to Africa. Its range extends from East Africa to Central Africa, south to Transvaal, and from Ethiopia and Eritrea. It prefers a habitat within open forests, arid grasslands, and bushlands at elevations of up to 6,561 feet. It is often seen in areas with termite mounds, where it likes to sleep, and can also be seen in areas with humans. It does not reside in extremely arid habitats or in forests...

Cape Grey Mongoose, Galerella pulverulenta
2012-11-05 11:18:06

The Cape grey mongoose (Galerella pulverulenta), also known as the small grey mongoose, is native to southern Africa. Until recently, it was thought to occur only in the Cape Province, but now it is known to inhabit other areas of South Africa, with a northern range that stretches into Angola. It prefers a habitat in areas with green vegetation like semi-arid scrublands and forested areas.  It has not been found in grassland areas, however, and is commonly seen under human structures. The...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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