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2008-05-15 09:44:00

Studies with non-human primates have made major contributions to our understanding of the brain and will continue to be an important, if small, part of neuroscience research, according to a recent review published in the British medical journal, The Lancet.Authors John P. Capitanio, professor of psychology at UC Davis and associate director of the California National Primate Research Center, and Professor Marina E. Emborg at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Wisconsin National...

2008-04-15 16:45:00

A group of almost 25 monkeys in the British colony of Gibraltar are expected to be killed due to the potential threat they pose to humans in the area, according to The Rock's tourist minister. "The decision was not taken lightly," said Ernest Britto, Gibraltar's Tourist Minister. "It is a last resort." Monkeys and macaques have coexisted with residents in the area for quite some time. The monkeys have become a national symbol for Gibraltar, but one pack became unruly in the tourism hotspots...

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2008-04-07 10:45:00

Having a lower social standing increases the likelihood that a monkey faced with a stressful situation will choose cocaine over food, according to a study at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. More dominant monkeys undergoing the same stressful situation had fewer changes in brain activity in areas of the brain involved in stress and anxiety and were less likely to choose cocaine. Robert Warren Gould, a graduate student in the laboratory of Michael A. Nader, Ph.D., presented the study...

2007-12-18 19:22:34

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated that monkeys have the ability to perform mental addition, and that they performed about as well as college students given the same test. Current evidence has shown that both humans and animals have the ability to mentally represent and compare numbers. For instance, animals, infants and adults can discriminate between four objects and eight objects. However, until now it was unclear whether animals could perform mental...

2007-09-06 15:20:00

CAMBRIDGE -- When trying to understand someone's intentions, non-human primates expect others to act rationally by performing the most appropriate action allowed by the environment, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard University. The findings appear in the Sept. 7 issue of the journal of Science. The work was led by Justin Wood, a graduate student in the Department of Psychology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard, with David Glynn, a research assistant, and...

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2007-07-16 11:38:10

Monkey viruses related to HIV may have swept across Africa more recently than previously thought, according to new research from The University of Arizona in Tucson. A new family tree for African green monkeys shows that an HIV-like virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV, first infected those monkeys after the lineage split into four species. The new research reveals the split happened about 3 million years ago. Previously, scientists thought SIV infected an ancestor of green monkeys...

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2006-07-25 09:45:00

WASHINGTON -- Language centers in the brains of rhesus macaques light up when the monkeys hear calls and screams from fellow monkeys, researchers said in a study that suggests language skills evolved early in primates. Researchers who scanned the brains of monkeys while playing them various sounds found the animals used the same areas of the brain when they heard monkey calls as humans do when listening to speech. Writing in this week's issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, the...

2005-12-13 14:38:59

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Long-tailed macaques used as performance monkeys in Indonesia are sometimes infected with viruses that could cross the species barrier and infect humans, investigators report. Performance monkeys may represent a threat to humans because of the way they are bought and sold and their close proximity to humans, Dr. Lisa Jones-Engel and her associates explain. The animals are usually obtained from animal markets where they are kept under crowded and...

2005-12-13 14:35:00

NEW YORK -- Long-tailed macaques used as performance monkeys in Indonesia are sometimes infected with viruses that could cross the species barrier and infect humans, investigators report. Performance monkeys may represent a threat to humans because of the way they are bought and sold and their close proximity to humans, Dr. Lisa Jones-Engel and her associates explain. The animals are usually obtained from animal markets where they are kept under crowded and unsanitary conditions that could...

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2005-11-04 06:15:00

Astrobiology Magazine -- Monkeys have a semantic perception of numbers that is like humans' and which is independent of language, Duke University cognitive neuroscientists have discovered. They said their findings demonstrate that the neural mechanism underlying numerical perception is evolutionarily primitive. Jessica Cantlon and Elizabeth Brannon described their findings with macaque monkeys in an article published online the week of Oct. 31, 2005, in the Early Edition of the Proceedings...


Latest Monkey Reference Libraries

Peruvian Spider Monkey, Ateles chamek
2014-04-28 10:03:07

The Peruvian Spider Monkey (Ateles chamek), known also as the Black-Faced Black Spider Monkey, is a species of spider monkey that resides not only in Peru, but also in Bolivia and Brazil. At 2 feet long, they are rather large among the species of monkey, and their strong, prehensile tails can be up to 3 feet long. Unlike many other species of monkey, they have only a vestigial thumb, an adaptation which enables them to travel utilizing brachiation. The Peruvian Spider Monkeys live in groups...

Brown Spider Monkey, Ateles hybridus
2014-04-28 09:58:59

Brown Spider Monkeys have long and thin limbs with their forelimbs being longer than their hind limbs. They also have a distinctive 75 centimeter long flexible and thin prehensile tail which at times acts like a fifth limb. The tip is hairless with ridged skin for better grip. All of these features of their body make it possible for them to climb trees and high elevations, hang and swing from one tree to another without having to lower themselves to the ground frequently. Their hands are...

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Panamanian Night Monkey, Aotus zonalis
2014-04-11 13:07:14

The Panamanian night monkey (Aotus zonalis), also known as the Chocoan night monkey, is a species of night monkey that can be found in Panama and Chocó in Colombia and it is thought to be found in Costa Rica, although this cannot be confirmed. This species prefers to reside many habitats including coffee plantations and secondary forests. Although it is classified as a distinct species, it is thought that this monkey may be a subspecies of the gray-bellied night monkey. The Panamanian...

White-headed Capuchin, Cebus capucinus
2012-07-13 14:39:09

The white-headed Capuchin (Cebus capucinus) is a New World monkey that is native to Central America, as well as the far northwestern area of South America. It is also known as the white-faced capuchin and the white-throated capuchin. Its Central American range includes Honduras, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Reports have shown that it may occur in southern Belize and eastern Guatemala, but these reports have not been confirmed. Its South American range is limited to the northwestern area...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.