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Latest Monkey Stories

2008-09-08 09:05:00

Endangered monkey population doubles in three decades in SW China GUIYANG, Sept. 6 (Xinhua) -- The number of wild gray snub-nosed monkeys, an endangered species only found in southwest China's Guizhou Province, has more than doubled to about 850 over the past three decades. The monkey, the rarest among the three species of golden monkeys in China's Sichuan, Yunnan, Gansu and Hubei provinces, mainly lives in the 419-square-kilometer mountainous Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve in Guizhou....

2008-09-06 15:00:09

The number of endangered gray snub-nosed monkeys, found only in China's Guizhou province, has more than doubled to about 850, a government bureau says. The population, which lives in Guizhou's 260-square-mile mountainous Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve, has grown because of steady environmental improvements and governmental protection measures, the Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve Administration Bureau said. Back in 1979, there were just 400 gray snub-nosed simians, the bureau...

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2008-08-26 08:10:00

Researchers found monkeys are more generous with friends compared to strangers, and demonstrated advanced prosocial tendencies, according to a new study. Scientists gathered data on capuchin monkeys at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University in Atlanta. During the experiment, monkeys were given a choice of receiving a food reward, or receiving a food reward and also having another monkey receive food.When the monkeys were paired with relative or "friend" they...

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2008-08-09 12:27:47

Noninvasive iron test helps modify diets for individual monkeys A medical test developed to detect an overload of iron in humans has recently been adapted to screen for the condition in some distant relatives: diminutive monkeys from South America, according to veterinarians at the Wildlife Conservation Society. The test"”which is now used to screen for elevated iron levels in marmosets and tamarins"”is a recent example of how advances in human health can be applied to animals in...

2008-07-23 15:00:57

A music video by Waikato children's entertainment group The Funky Monkeys has won best children's video of the year, as voted by the viewers of What Now at the inaugural Apra Children's Music Awards. The Thank You Song was filmed at Te Kowhai School and encourages good manners. (c) 2008 Waikato Times. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights Reserved.

2008-07-20 12:00:30

By Peter Larson, The Orlando Sentinel, Fla. Jul. 20--The recent trend in Pixar's animation scheme has been to take animals and humanize them. But in the middle of Disney, where fish speak perfect English and rats prepare gourmet meals, Joseph Martelli breaks the rule. This man-turned-tumble-monkey in the Animal Kingdom's Festival of the Lion King show swings, flips and grooms the front row. A gymnast since age 5, Martelli is accustomed to chalking up his hands and swinging from the rings...

2008-07-15 03:00:37

By Jeremy Slayton Richmond health officials are looking for a pet monkey responsible for biting a teenage girl Friday during the Fourth of July festivities at Byrd Park. The Richmond Health District needs more information to help determine a course of treatment for the girl. The patient is in good health and was treated by her physician, said George Jones, spokesman for the health department. However, health officials need to determine the species and origin of the monkey to determine...

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2008-07-10 08:20:00

Large-brained simians of the New and Old Worlds independently arose from smaller-brained ancestors After taking a fresh look at an old fossil, John Flynn, Frick Curator of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History, and colleagues determined that the brains of the ancestors of modern Neotropical primates were as small as those of their early fossil simian counterparts in the Old World. This means one of the hallmarks of primate biology, increased brain size, arose independently in...

2008-07-03 18:00:17

By BETH REESE CRAVEY There's been some monkey business going on in Clay County, specifically in OakLeaf Plantation's Eagle Landing subdivision. A primate has been sighted there several times, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission is seeking the public's help in finding it. The monkey, believed to be a Japanese or snow macaque, has been seen on Castle Oaks Court. State investigators received photos of the animal recently, according to Fish and Wildlife. "Do not attempt to capture...

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2008-05-19 00:25:00

Scientists at Emory University have genetically engineered monkeys to have Huntington's disease in hopes of gaining a better understanding of the fatal, hereditary ailment to develop possible new treatments.The researchers, from Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, said the monkeys are the first primates to be genetically modified. Describing their work, they said one of two surviving rhesus macaque monkeys engineered to have the defective gene that causes...


Latest Monkey Reference Libraries

Peruvian Spider Monkey, Ateles chamek
2014-04-28 10:03:07

The Peruvian Spider Monkey (Ateles chamek), known also as the Black-Faced Black Spider Monkey, is a species of spider monkey that resides not only in Peru, but also in Bolivia and Brazil. At 2 feet long, they are rather large among the species of monkey, and their strong, prehensile tails can be up to 3 feet long. Unlike many other species of monkey, they have only a vestigial thumb, an adaptation which enables them to travel utilizing brachiation. The Peruvian Spider Monkeys live in groups...

Brown Spider Monkey, Ateles hybridus
2014-04-28 09:58:59

Brown Spider Monkeys have long and thin limbs with their forelimbs being longer than their hind limbs. They also have a distinctive 75 centimeter long flexible and thin prehensile tail which at times acts like a fifth limb. The tip is hairless with ridged skin for better grip. All of these features of their body make it possible for them to climb trees and high elevations, hang and swing from one tree to another without having to lower themselves to the ground frequently. Their hands are...

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Panamanian Night Monkey, Aotus zonalis
2014-04-11 13:07:14

The Panamanian night monkey (Aotus zonalis), also known as the Chocoan night monkey, is a species of night monkey that can be found in Panama and Chocó in Colombia and it is thought to be found in Costa Rica, although this cannot be confirmed. This species prefers to reside many habitats including coffee plantations and secondary forests. Although it is classified as a distinct species, it is thought that this monkey may be a subspecies of the gray-bellied night monkey. The Panamanian...

White-headed Capuchin, Cebus capucinus
2012-07-13 14:39:09

The white-headed Capuchin (Cebus capucinus) is a New World monkey that is native to Central America, as well as the far northwestern area of South America. It is also known as the white-faced capuchin and the white-throated capuchin. Its Central American range includes Honduras, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Reports have shown that it may occur in southern Belize and eastern Guatemala, but these reports have not been confirmed. Its South American range is limited to the northwestern area...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.