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Latest Monoamine oxidase A Stories

2011-08-10 22:45:16

Mice without enzyme were also less inquisitive Do you run when you should stay? Are you afraid of all the wrong things? An enzyme deficiency might be to blame, reveals new research in mice by scientists at the University of Southern California. In a paper appearing in the October 2011 issue of the International Journal of Neuropharmacology, USC researchers show that mice lacking a certain enzyme due to genetic mutation are unable to properly assess threat. The mice exhibited defensive...

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2010-06-16 10:05:02

How postpartum depression arises and how it could be prevented Within the first week after giving birth, up to 70 percent of all women experience symptoms of the baby blues. While most women recover quickly, up to 13 percent of all new mothers suffer from symptoms of a clinical-level postpartum depression. Postpartum depression is defined as a major depressive episode starting within 4 weeks after delivery and is a significant public health problem. Postpartum blues represents a major risk...

2010-05-04 13:36:18

Greater levels of a brain protein called monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) "“ may explain why postpartum blues and clinical depression are so common after childbirth according to an important study published today in the Archives of General Psychiatry. Using an advanced brain imaging method, researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health discovered that levels of brain MAO-A in healthy women four to six days after delivery were 43% greater as compared to women not recently...

2009-09-25 09:22:03

In the future, diagnosing severe personality disorders, evaluating the childhood environment, assessing alcohol consumption and the analysis of the MAOA genotype may provide more accurate means for assessing risk among violent offenders, according to the Finnish research carried out jointly at the University of Helsinki and the Helsinki University Central Hospital Psychiatry Centre. "The many negative effects of violence could be alleviated by improving the accuracy of predicting violent...

2009-07-21 19:26:38

A common variation of the gene involved in regulating serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain may be linked to problem behaviors in adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities, new research indicates.The findings were published in the July 2009 issue of the American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and are available online at http://tinyurl.com/mw8baj."Problem behaviors in these populations account for billions of dollars in intervention costs each year,...

2009-07-21 14:18:28

Placebos are a sham "” usually mere sugar pills designed to represent "no treatment" in a clinical treatment study. The effectiveness of the actual medication is compared with the placebo to determine if the medication works.And yet, for some people, the placebo works nearly as well as the medication. How well placebos work varies widely among individuals. Why that is so, and why they work at all, remains a mystery, thought to be based on some combination of biological and psychological...

2009-06-07 23:49:46

Boys who carry a variation of the gene Monoamine oxidase A, are more likely to join gangs and be among the most violent members, U.S. researchers said. Criminologist Kevin M. Beaver at Florida State University said the findings apply only to males -- not girls with the same variant of the so-called warrior gene. While gangs typically have been regarded as a sociological phenomenon, our investigation shows that variants of a specific MAOA gene, known as a 'low-activity 3-repeat allele,' play a...

2008-12-18 11:45:00

When alcohol mixes with a certain highly active gene, the outcome may be aggression and violence. It is widely known alcohol consumption and violence are related. In addition, crime statistics show most impulsive homicides involve adolescents and middle-aged groups. Researchers in Finland set out to find a link between these elements and violence. Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is a gene that breaks down monoamines like serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine. Some variations of the gene can cause...

2006-08-09 02:50:00

WELLINGTON - New Zealand's indigenous Maori population reacted angrily on Wednesday to a researcher's findings that Maori have a high representation of a gene linked to aggression, as the nation faces a domestic violence crisis. Rod Lea told a genetics conference in Australia that Maori men were twice as likely as European men to carry monoamine oxidase, describing it as a "striking over-representation" of what has been described as the warrior gene. Media reports of Lea's findings outraged...

2006-06-28 12:21:49

By Charnicia Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Why are some men confrontational or break objects in fits of anger, while others appear to be more in control under similar circumstances? New study findings suggest the answer may involve genetic differences in combination with the men's early environment. A variation in a gene involved in the activity of the brain chemical serotonin, which is known to play an important role in regulating emotions and impulses, may cause some men to...