Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 8:52 EDT

Latest Monotremes Stories

Obdurodon tharalkooschild
2013-11-05 03:26:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The discovery of a lone tooth in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of Queensland, Australia, has led to the classification of a new, giant, now-extinct species of platypus known as the Obdurodon tharalkooschild. The new species in the duck-billed, egg-laying mammal’s family is detailed in the latest edition of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, and while the precise age of the fossil has not been yet been determined, it...

Western Long-beaked Echidna
2013-01-03 05:48:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A research team, led by the Smithsonian Institution, has found evidence that the western long-beaked echidna, one of the world's five egg-laying mammal species thought to have become extinct thousands of years ago, survived far longer than previously thought. The findings of this study, published in a recent issue of Zookeys, suggest they may well still exist in parts of Australia today. The western long-beaked echidna (Zaglossus...

08ee917469a433c01c5c848ca73154ae1
2010-11-19 09:25:00

Three species of long-beaked echidnas share the top spot on the Zoological Society of London's list of the world's most unique and threatened mammals, the UK conservation group announced on Thursday. Attenborough's Long-beaked Echidna (Zaglossus attenboroughi)--thought extinct until ZSL researchers discovered evidence of its continued survival three years ago--the Eastern Long-beaked Echidna (Zaglossus bartoni), and the Western Long-beaked Echidna (Zaglossus bruijnii) have been ranked "equal...

b7ebdfa591aa6814e839d8ace0c27bce1
2010-01-14 11:35:00

Abandon any notion that the duck-billed platypus is a soft and cuddly creature -- maybe like Perry the Platypus in the Phineas and Ferb cartoon. This platypus, renowned as one of the few mammals that lay eggs, also is one of only a few venomous mammals. The males can deliver a mega-sting that causes immediate, excruciating pain, like hundreds of hornet stings, leaving victims incapacitated for weeks. Now scientists are reporting an advance toward deciphering the chemical composition of the...

aaa477225efcd073ee9cbac5b448584f
2009-11-02 10:27:46

New insights into the biology of the platypus and echidna have been published, providing a collection of unique research data about the world's only monotremes. University of Adelaide geneticist Dr Frank Grtzner and his team have authored five of 28 papers which appear in two special issues of the Australian Journal of Zoology and Reproduction Fertility and Development. The articles shed new light on the extraordinary complex platypus sex chromosome system. "For the first time we have looked...

2009-06-25 06:45:00

LONE OAK, Texas, June 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Sally the platypus, like many of us, is not happy with how she looks and she imagines being someone who looks more like her friends. "I don't like being a platypus! The kids at school sometimes make fun of me because of the way I look!" she tells her dad one day. Her friends -- Chrissie the duck, Brian the beaver and Karen the koala -- have features she likes more than her strange-looking long bill and funny webbed feet and odd pouch on her tummy....

2009-06-16 10:58:09

A Wildlife Conservation Society research intern working in Papua New Guinea has completed the first study of a rare egg-laying mammal. The study of the long-beaked echidna in Papua New Guinea's Crater Mountain Wildlife Management Area was conducted by Muse Opiang, now of the Papua New Guinea Institute of Biological Research. It took several years to remotely track the porcupine-sized mammals and record their dens and other signs, WCS officials said. The study chronicles the first solid data...

17f74299284718516db434a40efc1a52
2008-05-07 13:40:00

An international consortium of scientists, led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has decoded the genome of the platypus, showing that the animal's peculiar mix of features is reflected in its DNA. An analysis of the genome, published today in the journal Nature, can help scientists piece together a more complete picture of the evolution of all mammals, including humans. The platypus, classified as a mammal because it produces milk and is covered in a coat of fur, also...

96ac23bb9682663440a14e83d58e122e1
2007-07-16 03:05:00

By Steve Connor A species of mammal that lays eggs and suckles its young in a pouch has been rediscovered in the jungles of Papua New Guinea, nearly 50 years after it was seen for the first and last time. Attenborough's longbeaked echidna - which was named after Sir David Attenborough - was known only from a single museum specimen caught in 1961. Its subsequent disappearance led scientists to believe that it had become extinct. However, a scientific expedition to the remote Cyclops...


Latest Monotremes Reference Libraries

42_3b730782cbc42fbce5fc1b7c3dad65be
2006-12-12 11:44:52

The Western Long-beaked Echidna is one of the four surviving echidnas. Fossils of this species also occur in Australia. The Western Long-beaked Echidna is present in New Guinea, in regions from 4,265 ft (1300m) and up to 13,123 ft (4000m). It is absent from the southern lowlands and north coast. Its preferred habitats are alpine meadow and humid mountain forests. Unlike the Short-beaked Echidna, which eats ants and termites, the Long-beaked species eats earthworms. The Long-beaked Echidna...

42_0d5367110135a26d91e589a7b66db252
2006-12-12 11:41:43

The Short-beaked Echidna, also known as the Spiny Anteater because of its diet of ants and termites, is one of four living species of echidna. The Short-beaked Echidna is covered in fur and spines and has a distinctive snout and a specialized tongue, which it uses to catch its prey at a great speed. The Short-beaked Echidna lays eggs. The species is found throughout Australia, where it is the most widespread native mammal, and in coastal and highland regions of southwestern New Guinea. It...

42_f294be1ec1fa65e8319af46dc77bf24b
2006-12-12 11:27:08

The platypus is a semi-aquatic endemic to eastern Australia and Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. It is the sole living representative of its family and genus, though a number of related species have been found in the fossil record. The unique appearance of this egg-laying, duck-billed mammal baffled naturalists when it was first discovered, with some...

More Articles (3 articles) »