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Latest Montana State University Stories

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2010-02-26 07:05:00

Visitors to national parks and forests are encouraged to use bear spray when they encounter grizzlies, but disposing of the bear spray canisters is a problem that three Montana State University engineering students addressed for their senior capstone project, sponsored by the Gallatin National Forest. Ashley Olsen, a Butte native who graduated from MSU in December, returned to campus Wednesday to demonstrate a bear spray recycling machine she developed over the past year with Seth Mott of...

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2009-11-25 09:40:17

A journey that started with a box of bird feet carried three Montana State University graduate students into the gruesome world of raptors and led to their findings being published in a prominent journal. Normally focused on dinosaurs, the students compared the claws and killing methods of four types of raptors and published a paper about their research in the Nov. 25th issue of PLoS One, a scientific journal published online by the Public Library of Science. The birds of prey that were...

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2009-07-17 13:45:52

The June cover of the Journal of Virology features a photograph of the unusual effects on a cell infected by a virus. Montana State University researchers were the first to view the virus, which they collected from a boiling, acidic spring in Yellowstone. The article linked with the cover photograph describes the researchers' findings about the life cycle of the virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV). No one has seen STIV replicate within a host cell prior to the work done by MSU...

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2009-07-17 13:41:50

Thread-like fungi that grow in soils at high elevations may play an important role in restoring whitebark and limber pine forests in Canada. Montana State University professor Cathy Cripps is looking for ways to use fungi to help pine seedlings get a strong start. Cripps' is working with resource managers and visitor relations staff from Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP). She is part of a project that aims to restore fire to the national park, reduce the impact of noxious weeds and restore...

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2009-07-17 13:17:27

Wolves have caused elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem to change their behavior and foraging habits so much so that herds are having fewer calves, mainly due to changes in their nutrition, according to a study published this week by Montana State University researchers. During winter, nearly all elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem are losing weight, said Scott Creel, ecology professor at MSU, and lead author on the study which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...

2009-04-21 14:25:34

Paleoecological data reveal strong influence of vegetation changes on wildfire frequency The increase in warmer and drier climates predicted to occur under climate change scenarios has led many scientists to also predict a global increase in the number of wildfires. But a new study in the May issue of Ecological Monographs shows that in some cases, changes in the types of plants growing in an area could override the effects of climate change on wildfire frequency. Philip Higuera of Montana...

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2009-04-16 07:55:00

Michael Knell carried a 75-million-year-old turtle into Bozeman Deaconess hospital recently, then laid it carefully on the bed that slides into the CT scanner. Hardly an ordinary patient, the turtle fossil was only the second in the world found with eggs inside it, said Knell, a Montana State University graduate student in earth sciences. His turtle (from the genus Adocus) came from the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Kanab, Utah. The previously described turtle, which was...

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2009-03-11 07:58:01

Arsenic may be tough, but scientists have found a Yellowstone National Park alga that's tougher. The alga -- a simple one-celled algae called Cyanidioschyzon -- thrives in extremely toxic conditions and chemically modifies arsenic that occurs naturally around hot springs, said Tim McDermott, professor in the Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences at Montana State University. Cyanidioschyzon could someday help reclaim arsenic-laden mine waste and aid in everything from space...

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2009-02-13 10:50:00

A new Montana State University study says that weather, especially in late winter and early spring, is getting warmer in northwestern North America. The research, published in the January issue of "Climatic Change," found that the coldest daily temperatures recorded in Bozeman, Mont., and Coldstream, British Columbia, have occurred less often over the past several decades. Extreme cold nighttime temperatures have become less frequent, and extreme warm nighttime temperatures have become more...

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2009-01-20 15:55:00

Ed Adams, a civil engineering professor used to spend time studying the nature of avalanches after setting them off with dynamite from a nearby shack on a steep slope at Bridger Bowl in Montana. Now, Adams, 58, has traded in his dynamite for a more sophisticated approach: using a $2 million lab aimed at gaining a better understanding of how avalanches occur, and more importantly how to predict them. Based at Montana State University, the so-called Subzero Research Facility was funded by the...


Latest Montana State University Reference Libraries

68_6e7931579904dbfd6e7a3cea3e9f213d
2010-11-17 16:24:59

Loren Acton is a physicist and an American astronaut. He was born Loren Wilber Acton on March 7, 1936 in Lewistown, Montana. He grew up on a ranch in Montana, and after high school he attended Montana State University. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1959. While attending the university, he met Evelyn Oldenburger. Soon after, the two were married at Grace Bible Church. He then continued his education and received a Doctor of Philosophy in Solar Physics from the University of...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.