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Latest Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Stories

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2009-12-16 09:10:47

Within a decade scientists could be able to detect the merger of tens of pairs of black holes every year, according to a team of astronomers at the University of Bonn's Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, who publish their findings in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. By modeling the behavior of stars in clusters, the Bonn team find that they are ideal environments for black holes to coalesce. These merger events produce ripples in time and space (gravitational...

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2009-12-16 09:05:45

A team of Chinese astronomers have discovered a giant planet close to the exotic binary star system QS Virginis. Although dormant now, in the future the two stars will one day erupt in a violent nova outburst. Professor Shengbang Qian of Yunnan Observatory leads the team of scientists who report their work in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. QS Virginis lies in the direction of the constellation of Virgo and is about 157 light years from the Sun. The system is...

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2009-11-24 12:05:00

The first large black holes in the universe likely formed and grew deep inside gigantic, starlike cocoons that smothered their powerful x-ray radiation and prevented surrounding gases from being blown away, says a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. The formation process involved two stages, said Mitchell Begelman, a professor and the chair of CU-Boulder's astrophysical and planetary sciences department. The predecessors to black hole formation, objects called supermassive...

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2009-02-26 10:49:57

The vast expanses of intergalactic space appear to be filled with a haze of tiny, smoke-like "dust" particles that dim the light from distant objects and subtly change their colors, according to a team of astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-II). "Galaxies contain lots of dust, most of it formed in the outer regions of dying stars," said team leader Brice M©nard of the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics. "The surprise is that we are seeing dust hundreds of...

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2009-02-24 09:55:00

A team of astronomers, led by Loretta Dunne from the University of Nottingham, have found some very unusual stardust. In a paper to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Dr Dunne and her team find new evidence for the production of copious quantities of dust in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, the remains of a star that exploded about 300 years ago. Interstellar dust is found throughout the cosmos. It is responsible for the dark patches seen in the Milky Way on...

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2009-02-12 07:59:26

In the early Universe, some galaxies may have stars packed together a million times more closely than in the present day, according to research by a University of Bonn team to be published in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. In our Galaxy, we are used to the idea that even the nearest stars are light years away from the Sun. But a team of scientists led by Professor Pavel Kroupa of the University of Bonn think things were very different in the early Universe. In...

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2008-11-24 10:04:18

Something vital is missing in the far distant reaches of the Universe: hydrogen - the raw material for stars, planets and possible life. The discovery of its apparent absence from distant galaxies by a team of Australian astronomers is puzzling because hydrogen gas is the most common constituent of normal matter in the Universe. If anything, hydrogen was expected to be more abundant so early in the life of the Universe because it had not yet been consumed by the formation of all the stars and...

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2008-09-16 11:35:00

An international team of scientists predict that our Galaxy, the Milky Way, contains a disk of "Ëœdark matter'. In a paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, astronomers Dr Justin Read, Professor George Lake and Oscar Agertz of the University of Zurich, and Dr Victor Debattista of the University of Central Lancashire use the results of a supercomputer simulation to deduce the presence of this disk. They explain how it could allow physicists to directly...

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2008-09-10 10:55:00

There appears to be an upper limit to how big the Universe's most massive black holes can get, according to new research led by a Yale University astrophysicist and published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Once considered rare and exotic objects, black holes are now known to exist throughout the Universe, with the largest and most massive found at the centres of the largest galaxies. These "ultra-massive" black holes have been shown to have masses upwards of one billion...

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2008-03-10 16:40:00

Astronomers at the University of Rochester, home to one of the world's largest groups of planetary nebulae specialists, have announced that low-mass stars and possibly even super-Jupiter-sized planets may be responsible for creating some of the most breathtaking objects in the sky.The news is ironic because the name "planetary" nebula has always been a misnomer. When these objects were discovered 300 years ago, astronomers couldn't tell what they were and named them for their resemblance to...


Latest Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Reference Libraries

Astronomy & Geophysics
2012-06-04 19:00:47

Astronomy & Geophysics (A&G) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). It was established in 1960 as The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society; the name was changed in 1997. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Sue Bowler (University of Leeds). The journal covers astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, planetary science, solar-terrestrial physics, global and regional geophysics, and the history...

The Astronomical Journal
2012-05-08 15:08:15

The Astronomical Journal (AJ) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal ran by the American Astronomical Society and published monthly by the Institute of Physics Publishing. It is one of the premier astronomy journals in the world. It was published by the University of Chicago Press until 2008. The society also owns the Astrophysical Journal. The journal was established in 1849 by Benjamin A. Gould. In 1861, publication was ceased due to the American Civil War. It went unpublished until 1885....

Publications Of The Astronomical Society Of The Pacific
2012-05-01 10:04:14

Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific is a monthly scientific journal managed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and published by the University of Chicago Press. It has been in publication since 1899, and is one of the premier journals for astronomical research, along with The Astrophysical Journal, The Astronomical Journal, Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. This journal publishes astronomy research, review papers,...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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