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Latest Moons of Saturn Stories

Image 1 - Cassini Eyes Blazing Trails In Saturn’s F-ring
2012-04-25 03:30:19

Brett Smith for Redorbit.com [ Watch the Video ] Scientists studying images from NASA´s Cassini spacecraft have found evidence of massive snowballs dragging glittering trails from one of Saturn´s rings. Saturn´s F ring has often been thought to be the most affected of the giant plant´s rings, often changing its look over the course of hours. The orbiting debris field measures a few hundred miles wide and is shepherded around the planet by two moons,...

Image 1 - Lake On Titan Resembles One In Africa
2012-04-21 05:09:53

A new study based on data from the Cassini spacecraft suggests that a lake on one of Saturn's moons behaves similarly to the Etosha salt pan on Earth. A group led by Thomas Cornet of the Université de Nantes, France, a Cassini associate, found characteristics of Ontario Lake on Titan are similar to Etosha Pan in Namibia, Africa because it drains and refills from below. Etosha Pan is a lake bed that fills with a shallow layer of water from groundwater levels that rise during...

Image 1 - Cassini Snaps Images As It Flies Over Enceladus
2012-04-17 03:36:15

These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moons Enceladus and Tethys were taken on April 14, 2012, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Cassini flew by Enceladus at an altitude of about 46 miles (74 kilometers). This flyby was designed primarily for the ion and neutral mass spectrometer to analyze, or "taste," the composition of the moon's south polar plume as the spacecraft flew through it.  Cassini's path took it along the length of Baghdad Sulcus, one of Enceladus' "tiger stripe"...

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2012-03-30 06:39:23

The Cassini spacecraft has captured new images and measurements of some of Saturn´s moons. This new evidence may help scientists determine if life does exist outside of Earth´s closed system. Enceladus, the moon with the most promise for microbial life, has cryovolcanic geysers on its surface that spews into the moons thin atmosphere. The Cassini spacecraft flew into these plumes at an altitude of 46 miles above the surface. They used the ion and neutral mass spectrometer...

Cassini Mission's Final Plans Laid Out
2012-03-26 12:09:00

The Cassini space probe will be diving into a gap between Saturn's atmosphere and its innermost ring for the final part of its mission in 2016. Linda Spilker, the mission's project scientist, outlined the details of the spacecraft's final leg recently at the 43rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) in the Woodlands, Texas. Cassini's last set of orbits may bring scientists a new perspective, and help unlock more clues about Saturn's rings. The spacecraft will carry out about...

Cassini Receives Smithsonian National Air And Space Museum's Highest Honor
2012-03-23 03:54:01

The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum has bestowed its highest group honor, the Trophy for Current Achievement, on NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn. The annual award recognizes outstanding achievements in the fields of aerospace science and technology. The trophy was presented Wednesday during an evening ceremony at the museum in Washington. Established in 1985, the award has been presented to seven NASA planetary mission teams. "This joint mission has produced an...


Latest Moons of Saturn Reference Libraries

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2004-10-19 04:45:44

Lagrangian Point -- In Lagrangian mechanics, a Lagrangian point (or L-point) is one of five positions in space where the gravitational fields of two bodies of substantial but differing mass combine to form a point at which a third body of negligible mass would be stationary relative to the two bodies. Bodies at the L-point will not move relative to the parent bodies if they are not perturbed by other gravitational forces. They are sometimes also referred to as libration points. The...

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2004-10-19 04:45:41

Saturn's moon Phoebe -- Phoebe is the outermost of Saturn's known moons. Phoebe is almost 4 times more distant from Saturn than its nearest neighbor (Iapetus). It was discovered by William Henry Pickering in 1898. Most of Saturn's moons have very bright surfaces, but Phoebe's albedo is very low (.06), as dark as lampblack. All of Saturn's moons except for Phoebe and Iapetus orbit very nearly in the plane of Saturn's equator. Phoebe's orbit is retrograde, inclined almost 175, and is...

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2004-10-19 04:45:41

Saturn's moon Titan -- Titan is the planet Saturn's largest moon. It is larger than either of the planets Mercury or Pluto and is the second-largest moon in the solar system after Ganymede (it was originally thought to be slightly larger than Ganymede, but recent observations have shown that its thick atmosphere caused overestimation of its diameter). Titan was discovered on March 25, 1655 by the Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens, making it one of the first non-terrestrial moons to be...

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2004-10-19 04:45:41

Saturn's moon Rhea -- Rhea is the second largest moon of Saturn. It was discovered in 1672 by Giovanni Cassini. Rhea is an icy body with a density of about 1.24 gm/cm3. This low density indicates that it has a rocky core taking up less than one-third of the moon's mass with the rest composed of water-ice. Rhea's features resemble those of Dione, with dissimilar leading and trailing hemispheres, suggesting similar composition and histories. The temperature on Rhea is -174°C in direct...

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2004-10-19 04:45:41

Saturn's moon Helene -- Helene is a moon of Saturn, discovered by Laques and Lecacheux in 1980 from ground-based observations. It is co-oribtal with Dione and located in its leading Lagrangian point (L4) and hence is sometimes referred to as "Dione B". ----- Orbital radius: 377,400 km Diameter: 33 km (36 x 32 x 30) Mass: Unknown Orbital period: 2.7369 days Orbital inclination: 0.2 ----- NASA Learn more on this topic from eLibrary here:

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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