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2014-05-22 12:23:03

HARRISBURG, Pa., May 22, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The cool, wet weather of spring 2013 has emerged as a strong ally of state woodland managers as they prepare to combat remnants of a statewide gypsy moth population that had been posed for a heavy outbreak across much of the state, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources officials said today. "Heavy defoliation in some areas last spring left our forest pest management experts bracing for increased statewide spraying...

The Moth Versus The Crowd
2014-01-24 10:46:18

Centre for Ecology & Hydrology An army of citizen scientists has helped the professionals understand how a tiny 'alien' moth is attacking the UK's conker (horse-chestnut) trees, and showed that naturally-occurring pest controlling wasps are not able to restrict the moth's impact. The study's conclusions are published this week in the open access scientific journal PLOS ONE. No bigger than a grain of rice, the horse-chestnut leaf-mining moth has spread rapidly through England and...

Higher Latitude Moths Less Susceptible To Temperature Changes
2013-09-24 10:11:14

Dartmouth College Moths in northern Finland are less susceptible to rising temperatures than expected, suggesting high latitude moth populations around the world may be partly buffered from the effects of rapid climate warming, according to a new Dartmouth-Finnish study based on the most extensive analyses yet conducted of seasonal patterns in forest animals. The results are important because moths are a key food source for birds, bats and many other predators, and (in their caterpillar...

Overlooked Diversity In The Diamondback Moth
2013-08-29 11:26:57

Pensoft Publishers The tiny diamondback moth (scientific name: Plutella xylostella) gets its common name from the array of diamond shapes along the margin of its forewing. Despite their diminutive size, the caterpillars of the diamondback moth exert tremendous damage on many crops including cabbage, broccoli, and crucifers at large. More than $1 billion is spent globally each year in efforts to control damage by this moth, reflecting its amazing capacity to evolve resistance to both...

2013-08-19 14:56:48

The larger the moth, the better hearing senses it needs if it wants to avoid its worst enemy, the bat. A large moth is easier to detect for a bat, and therefore evolution has forced large moths to develop larger and more sensitive ears. But the improved hearing comes at a price, says sound researcher Annemarie Surlykke from University of Southern Denmark. Bats orient themselves through echolocation, and they find their prey by emitting calls and then process the echoes reflected back to...

The Whys And Hows Of Standardized Methods For The GMO Monitoring Of Butterflies And Moths
2013-08-09 11:25:22

Pensoft Publishers Butterflies and moths were the first biological indicators considered for the purpose of GMO monitoring within the VDI guidelines series. The European community stipulates a monitoring plan in order to trace and identify any harmful effects on human health or the environment of GMO after they have been placed on the market. Butterflies and moths are widely accepted as relevant protection goals and have often been suggested and applied as suitable indicators for the...

Moths Use Hearing Differently When Picking Up Mating Calls
2013-07-08 14:30:46

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A joint team of Japanese and Danish researchers has found various moth species taking Salt-n-Pepa's suggestion to the next level -- talking about sex in a variety of ways. Lepidopterists have thought for years that moths use their sense of hearing to avoid predation from bats. However, the new study, which was published in Scientific Reports, revealed that their tiny ears are also used to detect the mating whispers of other moths....

Moths Jam Bat Echolocation Systems
2013-07-05 09:04:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For years, the military has used radio signals to jam an enemy's radar and a new study in the journal Biology Letters suggests hawk moths use the same technique to evade predation by bats. According to the study's authors from the University of Florida, hawk moths emit sonic pulses from their genitals in response to the high-frequency echolocation that bats produce to locate prey. "This is just the first step toward understanding a...

Ailanthus Tree's Invasive Species Status Offers Lesson In Human Interaction
2013-06-24 16:37:04

Penn State An exotic tree species that changed from prized possession to forest management nightmare serves as a lesson in the unpredictability of non-native species mixing with human interactions, according to researchers. "There are other invasive tree species in Pennsylvania, but the Ailanthus, by far, has been here longer and does more damage than any other invasive tree," said Matthew Kasson, who received his doctorate in plant pathology and environmental microbiology from Penn...

Love At First Sniff For Male Moths
2013-04-17 13:51:05

University of California - Riverside UC Riverside entomologists focus on moth pheromones to explain high proportion of hybrid moths in nature An international team of researchers, including an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, has an explanation for why we see so many hybrid moths in nature. The team closely examined the behavior and the olfactory circuitry of male moths and found an answer in female-produced pheromones – chemicals generally consisting of a...


Latest Moth Reference Libraries

Desert Red Bat, Lasiurus blossevillii
2012-04-25 05:07:00

The desert red bat, or western red bat, is one of 318 species of vesper bats. These bats can be found in North America, Central America, and even down to the northern most parts of South America. Like birds, the desert red bat migrates to warmer, desert climates during winter and returns to cooler climates during warm seasons. Males and females of this species have different migrating habits, and this hinders mating because they are always in different areas at different times. They will mate...

0_34183b773ecc04b529a33bf81d8eacd1
2009-04-28 20:58:59

The Agrotis infusa or Bogong moth is a species of nocturnal moth that in spring will swarm in great numbers around public buildings in Canberra, Australia. They are commonly found in Southern parts of Australia featuring a wingspan of one and three quarters inches and are brown or black in color with stout bodies covered with long thick scales. Larvae are often called cutworms and feed on a variety of plants of which they "cut" pieces and carry them back to their burrows for food. Adult...

45_d6add792fddcfea424a770b0fc4a067d
2009-04-28 19:30:52

Three species in the Acherontia genus make up the group commonly referred to as the Death's-head Hawkmoth. One species is native to Europe, while the other two are found in Asia. These moths are named for their unique skull shaped markings on their thorax and vividly colored abdomens. They are also capable to making loud noises if frightened. These moths will invade beehives for honey and will come and go unharmed because they imitated the scent of the bees. Females will lay green or...

45_a7b3c2ac1854fd5873578b31b765459a
2008-08-06 17:51:14

The Giant Leopard Moth (Hypercompe scribonia), also known as the Eyed Tiger Moth, is a moth of the Arctiidae family. It is distributed throughout the southern and eastern United States from New England to Mexico. This species has a wingspan of 3 inches. The wings are bright white with a pattern of neat black blotches, some hollow and some solid. The abdomen is dark blue with orange markings. The male has a narrow yellow line on the sides. Its legs have black and white bands. Adult moths...

40_1a3405ae7d3bb5794b7b09b72b34eb22
2005-09-08 12:27:59

PHOTO CAPTION: Elachista rufocinerea (Photo taken by Keith Edkins) The Elachistidae are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). Their larvae have a wide variety of habits including leaf tiers, seed borers, and leaf or stem miners. The Emperor Gum Moth (Opodiphthera eucalypti) is a species native to Australia, and can be easily found in all the states except for Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania. Eggs The eggs are laid on a leaf either singly or several in a row usually on...

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Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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