Quantcast

Moths Reference Libraries

Page 1 of about 13 Articles
Indianmeal Moth
2009-04-28 21:10:26

The Plodia interpunctella or Indianmeal moth is a member of the Pyralidae family and occasionally referred to as the North American High-Flyer. The larvae are also called waxworms that feed on dry grains and cereals. The females of the species can lay any where from 60 to 400 eggs in her lifetime. She will do so where there is a good food supply for the larvae. Each egg is less than 0.02...

Diamondback Moth
2009-04-28 21:04:39

The Plutella xylostella is often referred to as the Diamondback or Cabbage moth. This species is has a brief lifespan of only 14 days and is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region of Europe, but has since dispersed across the world. This species is capable of reproducing quickly and can travel great distances. Diamondback are considered serious pests in warmer climates when...

Comet Moth
2009-04-28 21:01:20

The Argema mittrei, more commonly known as the Comet or Moon Moth, is an endangered species. It is a native of Madagascar and that is the only place where one can observe them in the wild. This large silk moth can be bred in captivity and is one of the world's largest moths. Males have an average wing span of nearly 8 inches and a tail span of almost 6 inches. The lifespan of an adult...

Ailanthus webworm
2005-09-12 11:59:19

The Ailanthus webworm (Atteva punctella) is an Ermine moth found commonly in the United States. There origin of the Ailanthus webworm is clouded in uncertainty, but it is thought to be native to South Florida and the American tropics, with the original larval host plant, the Paradise Tree (Simarouba glauca). Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima), a tree originally from China, has been widely...

Atlas moth
2005-09-09 11:54:00

The Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) is a large saturniid moth found in the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeast Asia, and is common across the Malay archipelago to Indonesia. In India, Atlas moths are cultivated for their silk in a non-commercial capacity; unlike that produced by the related Silkworm moth (Bombyx mori), Atlas moth silk is secreted as broken strands. This brown, wool-like...

Pyralidae
2005-09-09 11:07:32

The Pyralidae or snout-moths are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). In many classifications, the Crambidae or grass-moths have been treated as a sub-division of the Pyralidae, the combination being one of the largest families in the Lepidoptera. The latest review by Munroe & Solis, in Kristensen (1999) retains the Crambidae as a full family. Harmful Pyralids Sunflower moth Homoeosoma...

Sesiidae
2005-09-08 14:45:27

PHOTO CAPTION: Synanthedon tipuliformis (Photo taken by Keith Edkins) The Sesiidae (clearwing moths) are a family of the Lepidoptera in which the wings are transparent. Their bodies are generally striped with yellow, sometimes very brightly, and they have simple antennae. The general appearance is sufficiently similar to a wasp or hornet to make it likely that the moths gain a reduction in...

Elachistidae
2005-09-08 12:30:15

PHOTO CAPTION: Elachista rufocinerea (Photo taken by Keith Edkins) The Elachistidae are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). Larvae have a wide variety of habits including leaf tiers, seed borers, and leaf or stem miners.

Oecophoridae
2005-09-08 12:16:08

PHOTO CAPTION: Esperia sulphurella (Photo taken by Keith Edkins) The Oecophoridae are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). Many Oecophorids feed on dead plant material and play a useful part in nutrient recycling. However, the family includes the Whiteshouldered House Moth Endrosis sarcitrella, a widely distributed species whose larvae infest stored grain, and the Brown House Moth...

Luna Moth
2005-08-25 11:41:50

The Luna Moth (Actias luna) is a large lime-green saturniid moth found in North America from east of the Great Plains in the United States to northern Mexico and from Ontario eastward through central Quebec to Nova Scotia in Canada. The caterpillar of this moth feeds on the leaves of birch, alder, persimmon, sweet gum, hickory, walnut, and sumac trees. The adults do not eat or have mouths,...

Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
Related