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Latest Motor control Stories

2011-08-17 13:18:00

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery but how do our brains decide when and who we should copy? Researchers from The University of Nottingham have found that the key may lie in an unspoken invitation communicated through eye contact. In a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team of scientists from the University's School of Psychology show that eye contact seems to act as an invitation for mimicry, triggering mechanisms in the frontal region of the brain that...

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2011-07-20 10:35:55

Players of the game "rock, paper, scissors" unknowingly mimic one another's hand shapes, increasing the chance of the game ending in a draw, according to new research published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B this week. The study shows that even when players lose out by drawing a game, they can't help themselves from copying the hand gestures of their opponent. The result is surprising because advantage is gained in the game by acting differently. Usually when chance is...

2011-06-24 12:10:38

Research from Harvard's Neuromotor Control Lab contradicts a common assumption about how the body learns to make accurate movements Albert Einstein defined insanity as "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Practicing the same task repetitively, though, tends to be the default procedure when trying to learn a new motor skill. A study led by Maurice Smith and colleagues at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) suggests that simple...

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2011-04-20 09:16:43

Right-handedness is a distinctively human characteristic, with right-handers outnumbering lefties nine-to-one. But how far back does right-handedness reach in the human story? Researchers have tried to determine the answer by looking at ancient tools, prehistoric art and human bones, but the results have not been definitive. Now, David Frayer, professor of anthropology at the University of Kansas, has used markings on fossilized front teeth to show that right-handedness goes back more than...

2011-03-11 00:00:27

Inspired by his daughter's need to improve her fine motor skills, app developer Frank Jensen is leveraging the multi-touch capabilities of the iPad into a tool to improve fine motor skills in kids and adults. San Diego, CA (PRWEB) March 10, 2011 BinaryLabs is turning the iPad into a tool for improving fine motor skills with the introduction of Dexteria, a new app for the iPad. The app features interactive multi-touch activities designed by licensed occupational therapists. "There are...

2011-02-20 21:47:44

According to University of Toronto speech-language pathologist Luc De Nil, the beat could be revealing such things as how children master one of the most complex tasks of all "“ speech. "The rapid and precise muscle movements of speech must be the most intricate, yet poorly understood, of all the sensory-motor skills," says De Nil. De Nil's interest in finger-tapping came out of his group's previous work on adults who stutter. His team discovered that they have problems in acquiring new...

2011-01-26 07:00:00

NEW YORK, Jan. 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Sean O'Loughlin, President of Global Biomechanical Solutions, a Manhattan Biomechanical Consulting firm, officially announced today that the Biomechanical Revolution in New York's automobile litigation arena is in full swing as more and more insurance and legal media outlets continue to publish articles authored by the revolutionaries on the front line. Like the Federalist Papers of the American Revolution, a number of prominent trial attorneys and...

2010-12-17 16:56:44

Findings identify key aspects of musical performance that evoke emotion-related brain activity, and show how performance nuances affect the brain in real-time -- study published in PLoS One It is well known that music arouses emotions. But why do some musical performances move us, while others leave us flat? Why do musicians spend years perfecting the subtle nuances that bring us to tears? Scientists at Florida Atlantic University have now identified key aspects of musical performance that...

2010-11-05 15:42:26

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, have identified a genetic variant which influences whether a person with dyslexia is more skilled with either the left or right hand. The finding identifies a novel gene for handedness and provides the first genetic evidence to support a much speculated link between handedness and a language-related disorder. The majority of people worldwide are right-handed. Since the left side of the brain controls the right...

2010-10-21 00:39:31

Some people may excel at riding a bike, tying a tie, or playing the piano, but those same people may find it difficult to explain or teach those skills to someone else. These motor skills are learned in one part of the brain, whereas classroom instruction and information read in a book are acquired in another area of the brain, explained F. Gregory Ashby, professor and chair of UC Santa Barbara's Department of Psychology. This second area of learning is the frontal cortex "“"“ the...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.