Quantcast

Latest Mount St. Helens Stories

565a7c14309654313f5468019803e01f1
2006-03-18 12:05:00

By Yereth Rosen ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) - Want to peer into the steaming summit of an erupting volcano without risking death? Anyone with an Internet connection and a computer can do just that, thanks to about 30 cameras and other recording devices set up on Alaska's Augustine Volcano that are streaming information to a Web site hosted by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, a joint federal-state office. The site http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Augustine.php  has received over 253...

1bea184d383b30797734e09039af85e71
2006-03-16 17:00:00

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) - A trail to the rim of the Mount St. Helens crater, closed since a slow eruption began in 2004, may reopen this year even as molten rock continues to ooze from the mountain. The National Forest Service began accepting conditional climbing reservations last month, though no official decision has been made, said Tom Mulder, manager of the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. "The public is interested," Mulder said. "It's a recreation niche, a learning...

2006-02-27 20:05:00

By Richard C. Lewis SOUTH KINGSTOWN, Rhode Island (Reuters) - Scientists are unearthing an Indonesian village buried nearly two centuries ago by the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history to learn how fast volcanic eruptions can turn deadly. Two years ago, a team of scientists from the University of Rhode Island, the University of North Carolina and the Indonesian Directorate of Volcanology began digging up the village of Tambora, which was buried by a volcanic eruption in 1815. The...

0afd8d4590af4108fe0c279ad2846cc81
2005-12-31 10:10:00

SEATTLE -- Roughly every three seconds, the equivalent of a large dump truck load of lava - 10 cubic yards - oozes into the crater of Mount St. Helens, and with the molten rock comes a steady drumfire of small earthquakes. The unremitting pace, going on for 15 months now, is uncommon, said U.S. Geological Survey geologist Dave Sherrod. Experts say it is unclear what the activity signifies or how much longer it will continue. "One view of this eruption is that we're at the end of the...

2005-11-22 19:58:52

SEATTLE (Reuters) - A rock fall at Mount Saint Helens caused a large gray cloud of dust to appear above the volcano on Tuesday, but there was no sign of increased seismic activity. Seismic levels at Mount Saint Helens, which came back to life last year by emitting steam and ash, are "amazingly regular," said Seth Moran, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey. Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980 and killed 57 people and was mostly dormant until September 2004, when new magma...

2005-09-12 11:34:23

In September 9 story headlined "Scientists find growing land bulge in Oregon," please read in first paragraph, "A large, slow-growing volcanic bulge in Western Oregon," instead of "A large, slow-growing volcanic bulge in Eastern Oregon." A corrected story follows: By Teresa Carson PORTLAND, Oregon (Reuters) - A large, slow-growing volcanic bulge in Western Oregon is attracting the attention of seismologists who say that the rising ground could be the beginnings of a volcano or...

2005-09-12 11:30:00

PORTLAND, Oregon -- A large, slow-growing volcanic bulge in Western Oregon is attracting the attention of seismologists who say that the rising ground could be the beginnings of a volcano or simply magma shifting underground. Scientists said that the 100 square-mile (260 sq-km) bulge, first discovered by satellite, poses no immediate threat to nearby residents. "It is perfectly safe for anyone over there," said Michael Lisowski, geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey's Cascades...

2005-09-09 18:00:00

By Teresa Carson PORTLAND, Oregon (Reuters) - A large, slow-growing volcanic bulge in Eastern Oregon is attracting the attention of seismologists who say that the rising ground could be the beginnings of a volcano or simply magma shifting underground. Scientists said that the 100 square-mile (260 sq-km) bulge, first discovered by satellite, poses no immediate threat to nearby residents. "It is perfectly safe for anyone over there," said Michael Lisowski, geophysicist at the United States...

2005-09-06 07:55:32

BEND, Ore. (AP) -- A recent survey of a bulge that covers about 100 square miles near the South Sister indicates the area is still growing, suggesting it could be another volcano in the making or a major shift of molten rock under the center of the Cascade Range. Recent eruptions at nearby Mount St. Helens in Washington state have rekindled interest in the annual Sisters survey and its findings. Oregon has four of the 18 most active volcanoes in the nation - Mount Hood, Crater Lake,...

03a577ae5dfb301c39cfe67831acd3751
2005-07-22 06:39:15

SEATTLE -- There's a whole lotta shakin' going on at Mount St. Helens these days as the restless peak does what it has done for thousands of years: build new lava domes that totter and fall and become the foundations for still more new ones. A series of unusually strong earthquakes - exceeding magnitude 3 - has been reported in recent days by the Cascades Volcano Laboratory in Vancouver, Wash., about 50 miles south of the mountain. The latest was a magnitude 3.1 quake early Thursday that was...


Latest Mount St. Helens Reference Libraries

Socompa
2014-08-19 10:02:27

Socompa is a complex stratovolcano that can be found at the border of Chile and Argentina, reaching an elevation of 19,852 feet. This volcano is best known for its avalanche debris deposit, which have formed the Monturaqui Basin on its west side, the most noted example of this type of deposit in the world. It is a difficult volcano to visit, taking at least a day by vehicle traveling from the north or the west. Socompa is also known for the microbial ecosystems that occur near grasses at its...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.