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Latest Mountain pine beetle Stories

Rocky Mountain National Park
2014-04-22 07:07:03

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An infestation of bark beetles is killing trees in the mountains across the western US. The beetles all reproduce in the inner bark of the trees, though they kill the trees in different ways. For example, the mountain pine beetle attacks and kills live trees, while other species live in dead, weakened or dying trees. In fact, more than 3.4 million acres of pine trees in Colorado alone have fallen to the mountain pine beetle....

Slippery Bark Helps Protect Trees From Pine Beetle Attack
2013-12-23 13:45:28

University of Colorado Boulder Trees with smoother bark are better at repelling attacks by mountain pine beetles, which have difficulty gripping the slippery surface, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. The findings, published online in the journal Functional Ecology, may help land managers make decisions about which trees to cull and which to keep in order to best protect forested properties against pine beetle infestation. The current mountain pine...

Bait Research Focused On Outsmarting Destructive Mountain Pine Beetle
2013-11-15 13:41:44

University of Alberta University of Alberta researchers are closing in on finding an effective bait to get ahead of the destructive spread of mountain pine beetle, which is now killing not only lodgepole pine forests, but jack pine. Nadir Erbilgin, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Forest Entomology in the University of Alberta Department of Renewable Resources, has been investigating pheromones emitted by the pest in North America's lodgepole and jack pine forests....

Massive Spruce Beetle Outbreak In Colorado Tied To Drought
2013-10-10 13:03:38

University of Colorado Boulder A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates drought high in the northern Colorado mountains is the primary trigger of a massive spruce beetle outbreak that is tied to long-term changes in sea-surface temperatures from the Northern Atlantic Ocean, a trend that is expected to continue for decades. The new study is important because it shows that drought is a better predictor of spruce beetle outbreaks in northern Colorado than temperature alone,...

2013-04-08 12:02:09

Twenty researchers – more than half of them Simon Fraser University graduates and/or faculty – could become eastern Canada´s knights in shining white lab coats. A paper detailing their newly created sequencing of the mountain pine beetle´s (MPB) genome will be gold in the hands of scientists trying to stem the beetle´s invasion into eastern forests. The journal Genome Biology has published the paper. “We know a lot about how beetle infestations can...

Mountain Pine Beetle Genome Sequenced
2013-03-27 15:42:48

BioMed Central The sequencing and assembly of the genome of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is published online this week in Genome Biology. The species is native to North America, where it is currently wreaking havoc in an area of forest ten times larger than previous outbreaks. This paper determines genes that may be involved in colonizing the trees, such as enzymes for degrading plant cell walls, and identifies potential sex chromosomes in the beetle. D. ponderosae...

2013-01-15 10:46:33

A research team involving several scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder has found an unexpected silver lining in the devastating pine beetle outbreaks ravaging the West: Such events do not harm water quality in adjacent streams as scientists had previously believed. According to CU-Boulder team member Professor William Lewis, the new study shows that smaller trees and other vegetation that survive pine beetle invasions along waterways increase their uptake of nitrate, a common...

2013-01-01 10:45:31

Trees and the insects that eat them wage constant war. Insects burrow and munch; trees deploy lethal and disruptive defenses in the form of chemicals. But in a warming world, where temperatures and seasonal change are in flux, the tide of battle may be shifting in some insects' favor, according to a new study. In a report published today (Dec. 31, 2012) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports a rising...

Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic Propelled By 2001-2002 Drought
2012-11-05 14:04:12

University of Colorado Boulder Beetles then moved into wetter and higher elevations A new University of Colorado Boulder study shows for the first time that episodes of reduced precipitation in the southern Rocky Mountains, especially during the 2001-02 drought, greatly accelerated development of the mountain pine beetle epidemic. The study, the first ever to chart the evolution of the current pine beetle epidemic in the southern Rocky Mountains, compared patterns of beetle outbreak...

Waldo Canyon Fire, Colorado
2012-06-29 11:00:06

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A conspiracy between Nature´s forces has sent walls of fire ripping through Colorado sending residents, officials, and first responders scrambling into action. One of the more devastating fires, the Waldo Canyon fire, has forced more than 32,000 people in and around Colorado´s second-most-populous city of Colorado Springs from their homes. The blaze, which began Saturday, is just 15 percent contained, according to the...


Latest Mountain pine beetle Reference Libraries

Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta
2014-04-27 08:06:16

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is found in western North America in the upper mountains and subalpine regions of Colorado’s northern Rocky Mountains. This tree is considered to be invasive in New Zealand. This tree is also known as the shore pine, twisted pine, and contorta pine as well as black pine, scrub pine, and coast pine. The Lodgepole pine grows best between 8000 and 10,000 feet above sea level. They like to grow in well-drained, slightly acidic, sandy soils on gentle south...

Shortleaf Pine, Pinus echinata
2014-04-14 11:10:26

Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) is native to the southeastern United States. This tree is found in 22 states and has a range from 10 feet in elevation up to 3000 feet. The range includes southeastern New York and New Jersey west to Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, Kentucky, southwestern Illinois, and southern Missouri; south to eastern Oklahoma and eastern Texas; and east to northern Florida and northeast through the Atlantic Coast States to Delaware. This pine can grow in wetlands as well as in...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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