Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 17:24 EDT

Latest Mountain pine beetle Stories

2008-07-16 06:00:24

By Karl Puckett Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinkie fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of...

2008-07-06 09:00:11

By Christine Weeber Pesticides often have larger effects than we intend. Some of those used in responding to the mountain pine beetle infestation are no different. Carbaryl, the active ingredient in the most common sprays used to protect trees against beetles, is one of these. It is a neurotoxin that is dangerous to humans and pets through skin contact, inhalation and ingestion through food or water. And it is highly toxic to bees, stoneflies and some fish. In 2005, 12 groups representing...

2008-06-26 06:02:33

By Cramer, John Scientists, economists, land managers and others will gather Thursday in Missoula to discuss the worsening infestation of bark beetles across the West. "Red Tree," a one-day public symposium, is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the University of Montana's University Center Ballroom. The symposium is free, but registration is required at 542-4300. Mountain pine beetles and other bark beetles have killed millions of acres of trees from Alaska to the Southwest in recent...

5aefd23fceafce2e585450fb523a62d81
2008-04-24 09:40:00

An outbreak of pine beetles is to blame for the destruction of almost 33 million acres of lodgepole pines in British Columbia, resulting in a massive release of carbon equal to five years of emissions from the entire system of Canadian transport.The findings come from Werner Kurz, a researcher at the Canadian Forest Service. Kurz said he estimates that 990 megatons of carbon dioxide could be released over 21 years of destruction by the pine beetle."When trees are killed, they no longer are...

7431f52a16a5c502bba31aa0e0a4cbac1
2008-03-28 15:50:00

Global warming could be the cause behind a beetle infestation killing off lodgepole pine forests in Colorado.About 60 percent of the lodgepole pines have turned red and brown."The population built up rapidly and exploded. It takes out the mature trees," said Ingrid Aguayo, an entomologist for the Colorado State Forest Service."Now we're seeing a new carpet of forest coming up," she said.Whether global warming is to blame or not, the evidence is daunting. A new calculation of government...

2008-01-15 13:10:00

Most of Colorado's lodgepole pine trees stand to be dead within the next 5 years.  In 1996, a bark beetle infestation was detected, and last year it spread over 500,000 acres more than previous years. Federal forestry officials say that this brings the total count of affected acres to 1.5 million. This infestation mainly affects five northern counties which straddle the Continental Divide, and has recently spread to part of southern Wyoming and the Front Range. Those effected counties...

2006-12-07 21:00:19

By HANNAH ZITNER VANCOUVER (CP) - Three B.C. mayors are demanding the federal government help thousands of homeowners pay for removing mountain pine beetle-infested trees. The mayors of Prince George, Kamloops and Kelowna told a news conference Thursday that Prime Minister Stephen Harper needs to help homeowners pay to have trees removed from their land. "For many homeowners, the need to deal with these dead trees comes with a real financial cost," Kamloops Mayor Terry Lake said. He...

2006-11-10 00:00:18

By SHANNON MONTGOMERY EDMONTON (CP) - Alberta wants forestry companies to step up the cutting of pine trees to help deal with a massive outbreak of destructive mountain pine beetles. Millions of the tiny insects have made their first major advance into Alberta's northern forest, settling in for the winter in up to 1.5 million trees - up from only 19,000 trees last year. The infestation has the government and industry scrambling to try and contain a scourge that has already ruined huge...

2006-01-17 07:37:45

GRANGEVILLE, Idaho -- Northwest loggers are worried British Columbia may be forced to harvest as much as 21 million acres of forests to stop the mountain pine beetle, flooding the market and driving down timber prices. The infected forests in British Columbia make up an area roughly 40 percent the size of Idaho. To combat the beetles, the province is increasing allowable timber cuts 78 percent; big trouble for mills throughout the Northwest. "They're going to bury us in the sand," said Dick...

5ea80e8d0cdb193dcbb6553b539b0c311
2005-08-04 08:20:58

VAIL, Colo. -- The mountain views along Red Stone Road suggest early autumn, with splashes of red, orange and rusty brown dotting the green hillsides above the homes and condominiums of this Colorado resort town. But this is summer and the colors represent dead pine needles on hundreds of pine trees that have been killed by beetles. The tree mortality rate around Vail is striking, but it's even worse in other parts of the West. According to U.S. Forest Service figures compiled for The...


Latest Mountain pine beetle Reference Libraries

Shortleaf Pine, Pinus echinata
2014-04-14 11:10:26

Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) is native to the southeastern United States. This tree is found in 22 states and has a range from 10 feet in elevation up to 3000 feet. The range includes southeastern New York and New Jersey west to Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, Kentucky, southwestern Illinois, and southern Missouri; south to eastern Oklahoma and eastern Texas; and east to northern Florida and northeast through the Atlantic Coast States to Delaware. This pine can grow in wetlands as well as in...

More Articles (1 articles) »