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Latest Mouse-eared bats Stories

Social Networks Of Endangered Indiana Bat Tapped Into To Aid In Habitat Management
2014-06-18 03:00:40

Lynn Davis, Virginia Tech Depending on habitat availability, the endangered Indiana bat may be able to use its social connections to survive a certain amount of roost destruction, according to research by scientists at Virginia Tech and The Ohio State University. Alexander Silvis of Lynchburg, Ohio, and Andrew Kniowski of Boones Mill, Virginia, both doctoral students in Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment, made findings from Ohio State field studies highly...

White Nose Syndrome Relatives Found
2013-07-26 12:15:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online First identified in 2006 in upstate New York, White Nose Syndrome (WNS) has decimated the North American bat population, killing millions of animals over the past several years. According to a new report in the journal Fungal Biology, biologists from the US Forest Service have identified several benign relatives of the fungus that is believed to cause the disease. "Identification of the closest known relatives of this fungus makes...

2013-01-29 10:09:59

Research by U.S. Forest Service scientists forecasts profound changes over the next 50 years in the summer range of the endangered Indiana bat. In an article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, Forest Service Southern Research Station researchers Susan Loeb and Eric Winters discuss the findings of one of the first studies designed to forecast the responses of a temperate zone bat species to climate change. The researchers modeled the current maternity distribution of Indiana...

Bat Sexes Alternate Between Cohabitation And Solitude
2013-01-25 12:37:51

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Family dynamics can vary from species to species. However, a new study from researchers at Leeds University shows that family dynamics among the tiny Daubenton´s bats living in the north of England can vary by altitude and season. According to the U.K. researchers report in the open access journal PLOS ONE, the family dynamics of the Daubenton´s bats that live along a 31-mile stretch of the River Wharfe can be organized by...

Living The Night Life Bats Are Needed All The Time-Not Just On Halloween
2012-10-31 15:03:13

National Science Foundation Researchers are identifying the important ecological and economic contributions of bats; gleaning lessons from incredible bat abilities that may advance technology; and helping to battle a new fatal bat epidemic The sight of bats hanging upside down in creepy caves or fleeing in fluttery flocks from their subterranean haunts at dusk like "bats out of hell" may spook even the most rational, otherwise unflappable observer. Nevertheless, on every day (and...

2012-09-06 08:20:07

Selangor, Malaysia, Sept 6, 2012 - (ACN Newswire) - Genetic studies of Myotis muricola, otherwise known as the Wall-roosting Mouse-eared bat or Nepalese Whiskered Myotis, suggest that it consists of not one, but two distinct species.M. muricola is widespread on the Malay Archipelago, a region with an island geography that provides natural boundaries and as a result displays some of the richest biodiversity in the world. Until now scientists had compared the shape and size of Myotis bats...

New Tool Can Identify Bats By Sound
2012-08-07 11:17:02

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Have you ever tried to tell the difference between 34 different bat species? Like a fingerprint or the specific pitch and timbre of a person´s voice can differentiate one human from another, so, too, can the subtleties in squeaks and squelches set one bat apart from the others. Now, a team of ecologists have built an echo-location tool which can identify specific bats based on their vocal signatures. The new tool,...

Social Bats More Likely To Pay Higher Price From White-nose Syndrome
2012-07-04 08:13:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online New studies conducted by biologists at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) show that the effects of white-nose syndrome, a deadly bat disease, may be worse in bat colonies who are increasingly social during hibernation. The study found that bat species that tend to cluster together during hibernation, even with declining populations, would continue to spread white-nose syndrome. In 2006, white-nose syndrome made a dramatic...

Journey Of Little Brown Bats Tracked By Chemical 'Fingerprinting'
2012-05-31 03:41:52

Little brown bats are tiny creatures that fly through the night hunting insects that humans consider pests, zooming past trees in a wave of sleek brown fur. The 3.4 inch long bats, when not hunting insects in warmer months, hibernate in abandoned mines and caves during the winter. As peaceful as this image seems, a disease known as white-nose syndrome jeopardizes the little brown bat´s very survival.  A groundbreaking method of tracking the little brown bat by using stable...


Latest Mouse-eared bats Reference Libraries

Greater mouse-eared bat, Myotis myotis
2013-10-11 08:16:26

The greater mouse-eared bat is primarily found throughout Europe. It weighs about 1.6 ounces, has a wingspan of 14-18 inches and its body is 3-3.5 inches long. The Greater mouse-eared bat has a medium brown upper-body and a greyish belly. This species of bat does not use echolocation for hunting but rather catches its prey from the ground and water surfaces, a process known as gleaning. It finds its prey by listening for the noises that these animals usually make. Its menu consists of...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser mouse-eared bat, Myotis blythii
2013-09-27 10:50:24

Populations have been found in southern Europe, southern central Europe and southwestern Asia. The lesser mouse-eared bat is a very social species therefore they travel and remain in groups rather than individually. These groups can be as large as 500 bats and could be mixed with the greater mouse-eared bat. Their feeding habitats are scrub areas, grasslands, farmland, and some gardens. It eats grass crickets and cockchafers. These insects are hunted by the lesser mouse-eared bat while...

Common Bent-wing bat, Miniopterus schreibersii
2013-09-18 15:24:07

This species is part of the largest group of bats in the Vespertilionidae family and are found in subtropical regions such as Australia, Ethiopia, Europe and some Asian areas. Large caves or mines are ideal locations where colonies ranging from a few dozen to several million can hibernate. Hibernation lasts for about 12 days. Colonies will migrate several times a year depending on the weather patterns and as far away as 520 miles. Although the Common Bent-wing Bat is dependent on...

Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalist
2012-10-05 08:36:41

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalist) is a mouse-eared bat that can be found in North America. Its range primarily includes eastern and Midwestern states, but it can be found in some southern areas of the United States. During the winter, its range becomes much smaller, with most populations occurring in large clusters in only a few caves. One study conducted in 1985 suggested that an estimated 244,000 individuals of this species reside in Indiana. Its range overlaps that of the endangered gray...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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